Dermestidae

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Related to Dermestes: Dermestes lardarius, dermestids

Dermestidae

[dər′mes·tə·dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The skin beetles, a family of coleopteran insects in the superfamily Dermestoidea, including serious pests of stored agricultural grain products.

Dermestidae

 

a family of beetles. The body, which measures 2–12 mm long, is flat-cylindrical or oval and has short claviform antennae. The larvae are mobile, elongated, greatly chitinous, with long protruding hairs. There are approximately 800 species, distributed throughout the world. In the USSR there are 90 species, most of which are found in the southern regions. Dermestids feed on dry animal and plant substances; some eat pollen and are found on flowers. Many species do great damage to fur, leather, carpets, smoked and dried meat or fish, zoological collections, dried fruits, dried medicinal plants, and herbariums. The most destructive species are the larder beetle (Dermestes lardarius), Attagenus pellio, and the museum beetle (Anthrenus museorum). The khapra beetle (Trogoderma granarium) harms stored grain. Control measures are primarily prophylactic; they include quarantine (in the case of the khapra beetle) and fumigating storage areas with gas.

References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently Osuji [7] stated, that salting of fish gives protection against Dermestes maculatus, partly not because larval development is prolonged but mainly because larval mortality increases with increasing salt content.
It has been shown that Dermestes maculatus which infests dry fish as stated by Osuji [7] could equally infests edible insects if not properly stored, thus the use of various constituents (salt and pepper) as preservative by rural people should be encouraged as it has been indicated that these pests actually devalue the proteins' content of these edible insects if not properly stored.
The extent and value of quantitative losses caused to dried fish by Dermestes spp.
Cohen E Fatty acid synthesis by the Hide beetle Dermestes maculatus (Dermestidae: Coleoptera) Ent.
Osuji FNC The effects of salt treatment of fish on the developmental biology of Dermestes maculatus (Coleoptera, Dermestidae) and Necrobia rufipes (Cleridae).
Over the past decades, recognition by people of the effects of Dermestes maculatus on the role of nutritional value of stored product in food security has grown considerably.
Despite these problems that pose challenges to insect Cultivators and Gatherers, it is also noticed and confirmed that Dermestes maculatus (Hide beetle), regarded as pests of stored food products, feed on dead insects.
Dermestes maculatus is widely recognized as a cosmopolitan pest of stored commodities especially those containing animal proteins.
Development of Dermestes maculatus is not possible at 40[degrees]C or above, because, temperature above 40[degrees]C can kill or repel all these beetles.
To this effect, it has become pertinent to investigate the infestation effect of Dermestes maculatus on the nutritional composition of two selected edible insects Oryctes boas and Rhynchophorus phoenics larvae, commonly known as Rhinocerous beetle larvae and Snout beetle larvae, respectively, having been observed to be a major source of protein like fish and other animal meat.
These were: the larvae of Rhynchophorus phoenicis and Oryctes boas) and the sample of Dermestes maculatus (Hide beetle).