Dermestidae

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Dermestidae

[dər′mes·tə·dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The skin beetles, a family of coleopteran insects in the superfamily Dermestoidea, including serious pests of stored agricultural grain products.

Dermestidae

 

a family of beetles. The body, which measures 2–12 mm long, is flat-cylindrical or oval and has short claviform antennae. The larvae are mobile, elongated, greatly chitinous, with long protruding hairs. There are approximately 800 species, distributed throughout the world. In the USSR there are 90 species, most of which are found in the southern regions. Dermestids feed on dry animal and plant substances; some eat pollen and are found on flowers. Many species do great damage to fur, leather, carpets, smoked and dried meat or fish, zoological collections, dried fruits, dried medicinal plants, and herbariums. The most destructive species are the larder beetle (Dermestes lardarius), Attagenus pellio, and the museum beetle (Anthrenus museorum). The khapra beetle (Trogoderma granarium) harms stored grain. Control measures are primarily prophylactic; they include quarantine (in the case of the khapra beetle) and fumigating storage areas with gas.

References in periodicals archive ?
But if not for the bug problems suffered by a close friend of mine, we might have lost all of our own trophies to hungry dermestid beetles.
But when he came out to the house, he soon discovered that dermestid beetles were hard at work in Del's trophy room.
He didn't know too much about dermestid beetles, and the national company be worked for didn't even exterminate for them.
In the wild, dermestid beetles are numerous and exist everywhere.
Dermestid beetles and some other insect pests associated with stored silkworm cocoons in India, including a world list of dermestid species found attacking this commodity.
Clearly, maintaining a healthy colony of Dermestid beetles is a science and, in truth, The Bug Man owes his well-earned nickname to his wonderful wife, Danielle, the true Bug Lady.
Oh, one more important note: Dermestid beetles smell, because the larvae actually consume the manure of the adults, which, of course, eat decomposing meat.