Descamisados


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Descamisados

 

(the Shirtless Ones), self-designation of politically active representatives of the urban poor during the revolution of 1820-23 in Spain. They demanded the establishment of popular sovereignty and broad democratic reforms. They became allied with the left wing of the comuneros organization.

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The president invoked Evita, the unofficial saint of Argentina's descamisados, or"shirtless ones," to distance himself from the free-market shock doctrine of his Ferrari-driving Peronist predecessor, Carlos Menem, who was president from 1989 to 1999.
Dai a diferenca maior, segundo Hannah Arendt, entre a compaixao e a piedade: tendo como exemplo Cristo, a compaixao so compreende particulares, so e afetada por sofredores concretos, enquanto a piedade se caracteriza pelo amor aos miseraveis, aos descamisados, as massas sofredoras (Arendt, 1965, p.
Et, comme, jadis, le chef de file des descamisados (les sans-chemise, c'est-a-dire les demunis), <<Cristina>> excelle, aussi, dans l'art du populisme.
Mgr Franceschi reprouvait tout particulierement l'expression les descamisados du Christ utilisee par Peron (descamisados, ou les sans-chemises, etait le nom donne a la classe ouvriere peroniste).
His wife devoted her time to the poor, or the descamisados (shirtless ones), of Argentina and over the next seven years brought the working classes into a position of political power never witnessed before.
They became known as Los Descamisados (Spanish for 'shirtless-ones' implying they did not wear suitcoats like the middle classes).
The club, which sits in a quiet square where rich Recoleta nudges up against the vast Avenida 9 de Julio, turns one's thoughts to that invincible Argentine phantom Juan Peron, who unleashed a mob of workers and descamisados, shirtless slum dwellers, against the place in 1953.
Evita had led her descamisados [shirtless ones] to believe she would accept the candidacy for vice president.
The shirtless ones, the descamisados, did it with Eva Peron.
Here the direct analogy would be to Peronist culture in Argentina and the celebration of the descamisados and cabecitas negras in Peronist rhetoric.
And on the soundtrack, she and co-stars Jonathan Pryce and Antonio Banderas breathe contemporary resonance into the 1976 musical pastiche about Eva Peron, wife of Argentine dictator Juan Peron and saint of the descamisados (the poor huddled masses).
Congress hastened to approve the idea twenty days before she died, and Evita herself refers in her last will and testament to that illusion of eternity: "I will thus feel forever close to my people and will continue to be the bridge of love linking the descamisados and Peron.