Desiderius


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Desiderius

(dēsĭdēr`ēəs), d. after 774, last Lombard king in Italy (756–74). The duke of Tuscany, he was chosen king with the support of the pope and of Pepin the Short, who was king of the Franks and whose son Charles (later Emperor Charlemagne) married Desiderius's daughter. Desiderius's alliance with his son-in-law Duke Tassilo of Bavaria and his subsequent interference in Roman affairs incensed Charlemagne, who repudiated (771) his wife and provoked open conflict. Desiderius responded by supporting the claims of the children of Charlemagne's brother Carloman (d. 771), by attacking Pope Adrian IAdrian I,
d. 795, pope (772–95), a Roman; successor of Stephen IV. At Adrian's urging, Charlemagne crossed the Alps and defeated the Lombard king, Desiderius, who had annexed papal territory. That defeat marked the end of the Lombard kingdom.
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, and by occupying several papal cities. Charlemagne invaded (773) Italy, captured (774) Desiderius at Pavia after a long siege, and proclaimed himself king of the Lombards. Desiderius was forced to retire to a monastery at Liège.
References in periodicals archive ?
De Taedio Iesu is shortened from Desiderius Erasmus, "A Short Debate Concerning the Distress, Alarm, and Sorrow of Jesus" (Disputatiuncula de Taedio, Pavore, Tristicia Jesu) in Spiritualia and Pastoralia, trans.
39) Desiderius Erasmus, The Education of A Christian Prince, ed.
An old Clydesider I used to know once said to me, 'Eras must end, Desiderius.
Opening proceedings for the workshop, Major General Desiderius Shilunga, Namibian Police Regional Commander for the Khomas Region said, "We need to work hand in hand to stop criminals from using Namibia's financial systems for their personal gain.
Carl Jung popularized a saying variously attributed to the Latin writings of Desiderius Erasmus or an ancient Spartan proverb: bidden or unbidden, God is present.
No contemporary reference to humanism can omit reference to the historical notions of humanism exemplified by such historically important figures as Francesco Petrarca (1304-1374) and Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536).
Historians and scholars of literature show how Dutch Roman Catholic humanist Desiderius Erasmus (c.
Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (better known simply as "Erasmus") was a famous sixteenth-century Dutch philosopher and educator who espoused tolerance and humanitarianism.
Desiderius Erasmus Concerning the Aim and Method of Education.
These gestures, bizarre even in the context of a movie theater, were thought to signify mental instability, at least for Dutch Renaissance humanist Desiderius, and "odd gestures--like waving the hands--in front of the face or grabbing the air" had, since the Hippocratic writings, "been observed as symptoms of disease or even of death" (Erasmus 1703-06 1040 cited in Boyle 1998 24; Hippocrates 1839-61 cited in Boyle 1998 24).
Around the year 1070 he entered the Benedictine order in Monte Cassino where the educated abbot Desiderius (1058-1086), who later became Pope Victor Ill (1086 1087), let him work in favourable conditions.