demesne

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demesne

(dĭmān`), land under feudalismfeudalism
, form of political and social organization typical of Western Europe from the dissolution of Charlemagne's empire to the rise of the absolute monarchies. The term feudalism is derived from the Latin feodum,
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 kept by the lord for his own use and occupation as distinguished from that granted to tenants. Initially the demesne lands were worked by the serfs in payment of the feudal debt. As the serfs' labor service came to be commuted to money payments, the demesne lands were often cultivated by paid laborers. Eventually many of the demesne lands were leased out either on a perpetual, and therefore hereditary, or a temporary, and therefore renewable, basis so that many peasants functioned virtually as free proprietors after having paid their fixed rents. In England the term ancient demesne, sometimes shortened to demesne, referred to those lands that were held by the crown at the time (1066) of William the Conqueror and were recorded in the Domesday Book. The term demesne also referred to the demesne of the crown, or royal demesne, which consisted of those lands reserved for the crown at the time of the original distribution of landed property. The royal demesne could be increased, for example, as a result of forfeiture. The lands were managed by stewards of the crown and were not given out in fief.

demesne

All lands belonging to the lord of a manor.

demesne

1. land, esp surrounding a house or manor, retained by the owner for his own use
2. Property law the possession and use of one's own property or land
3. the territory ruled by a state or a sovereign; realm; domain
4. a region or district; domain
References in periodicals archive ?
Andy McFarlane scored to make it five before David Connaghty hit a consolation double for Desmesne.
Every image in the poem seems to be one of sameness as are the social configurations: bards in fealty to Apollo, Homer's desmesne, Cortez and "his men," and the "planet" of "his ken" are merely a tautological cosmic equivalent to Cortez' original "wond'ring" eyes.
3) I This prescription accounts for much of what Konwicki has been doing in his writing over the last decade or so, especially in the professedly modest guise of revealing his thoughts, beliefs, and way of life through anecdotes and contrivedly idle speculations emanating from his desmesne in Warsaw on New World Avenue, with his cat, Ivan, companion of his mischief and tantrums, reminiscences and dreams.