detection limit

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detection limit

[di′tek·shən ‚lim·ət]
(analytical chemistry)
In chemical analysis, the minimum amount of a particular component that can be determined by a single measurement with a stated confidence level.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the first approach, minimum detection limits are defined by the monitoring defect, and the standard deviation is defined by the difference between the monitoring and critical defects.
Sensitivity is the key when low detection limits are the goal and the aurora Elite will be the enabler allowing trace elemental analysts to redefine their application boundaries.
They were able to achieve a 3-million-fold improvement in the detection limit by using small structures that could only be seen with a powerful electron microscope.
In 2008, the LaserTrace+ made possible the lower detection limit (LDL) of 200 parts-per-trillion, affording the widest dynamic range of any dedicated analyzer currently in the market.
When the assay was tested with artificially contaminated food samples, the detection limit for each organism increased by a factor of 10 to 50 in most samples, but these were still much lower than the detection limits of a conventional Elisa.
To determine the detection limit of real-time PCR, the initial 1000 nanograms of material were serial-diluted 10-fold to 0.
Among other methods that are used to narrow the gap between the detection limits of conventional methods and biosensor technologies, immunomagnetic separation (IMS) is considered very promising.
Coupled with the VP100 vapour generation accessory, the iCE 3000 Series AA spectrometers are capable of reaching detection limits of 0.
This configuration demonstrates improved detection limits for lower concentrations of samples, being capable of providing accurate, dependable analysis of phosphorus, sulfur and potassium.
Very high signal-to-noise ratio, and low detection limits can be achieved in chemiluminescence applications including immunoassays, enzyme assays, reporter gene assays, ATP determinations, RNA and DNA quantitation, cytotoxicity measurements, mycoplasma detection, beta-galactosidase assays and cell proliferation measurements.
The directive, which became effective July 1, prohibits electronics or electronic equipment containing materials, such as lead, mercury and hexavalent chromium, in excess of allowable detection limits.
Several retrospective studies, however, showed that serum FLC had substantially higher detection limits than serum and urine IFE for diagnosis of the monoclonal light chain diseases of primary light-chain amyloidosis (3, 4) and light chain deposition disease (2), as well as nonsecretory multiple myeloma (5).

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