Deutschmark


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Deutschmark

, Deutsche Mark
the former standard monetary unit of Germany, divided into 100 pfennigs; replaced by the euro in 2002: until 1990 the standard monetary unit of West Germany
References in periodicals archive ?
What we are looking at is the possible reintroduction of the Deutschmark (DEM) or a transformation in the euro that would make it more comparable to a 'Greater Deutschmark,'" Derrick said while speaking to a group of investors at the Beirut International Exhibition and Leisure Center on Friday.
Later the same day he was considering a further 3pc rate rise, but wiser council prevailed and the government threw in the towel, devalued its currency and stopped trying to peg it to deutschmark.
While the price stability record of the euro is similar to that of the deutschmark, Germany suffered some growth losses in the initial phase of EMU due to an unnecessarily restrictive monetary policy.
Higher costs of raw materials could be traced in large part to a poor vegetable harvest and the declining value of the Deutschmark against the dollar.
Kneppeck said his parents aren't pleased with what they see as Germany losing its identity when it joined the European Union and abandons the Deutschmark for the European Currency Unit.
Or he could bet that the Mexican prime rate in July, paired with the three-month yield on the German deutschmark, would be over or under the number 26.
We have in place strategies which are intended to limit the impact of foreign currency exposures on our business, including currency risk-sharing arrangements with our Japanese suppliers and forward exchange contract coverage on our German Deutschmark related purchases.
In early January of this year Jacobs has increased its price per 1/2 kilo unit of all its labels including Hag and Onko by 1 Deutschmark.
As an optimist, I believe that the high interest rates for the other foreign currencies such as the deutschmark or yen are not sustainable at their current high level.
Compare this with the 500,000 deutschmark annual income of a top manager and the 60,000 deutschmark income of a foreman in a West German company of similar size.
The small Alternative for Germany (AFD) party wants to ditch the euro and bring back the Deutschmark currency.
This contrasts with a similar opinion poll taken in Germany by TNS, a European polling firm, that found that 65 percent of Germans are in favor of switching back to their former currency, the deutschmark.