diacritic

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diacritic

A diacritic (or diacritical mark) is a mark added to a letter, usually to indicate a specific pronunciation of that letter.
Of the various languages using the Latin alphabet, English is one of the few that generally does not use diacritical marks. Those words that do contain them are typically foreign loanwords whose diacritics have been retained in English. The most common of these that appear in English are known as accents (either acute, as in café, or grave, as in vis-à-vis).
There are, however, a few diacritics that are used in native English words.
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diacritic

A small mark added to a letter that changes its pronunciation, such as an acute accent (á), a grave accent (à) and a cedilla (ç).
References in periodicals archive ?
If a consonant is aspirated, then diacritics to indicate this could be employed; for example, <korn> (grain) would be transcribed as [[k.
The diacritics help the speech recognition software because it helps give the exact meaning, thus giving it a high level of accuracy.
These diacritics traditionally appear in some types of materials such as dictionaries and children's books.
diacritics for Arabic text, to make it easier to read and understand.
The general presentation of the book is attractive, but Spanish copyediting should have been done as all diacritics are missing.
These tests had revealed software problems with searches involving diacritics.
Holding down on the vowel keys (and certain consonants like "n" and "c") reveals alternate versions of those letters with diacritics like the umlaut, tilde or acute accent.
by Jay Miskowiec, "Of Other Spaces", in Diacritics, 16/1 (1986), 22-27.
The Vietnamese entries include their diacritics (although the Lao and Khmer ones appear only in their Romanised transliterations).
Barbier (it's a pity about the mistakes in Czech diacritics, however), is definitely captivating.
13), proves that the scribe who wrote these words was aware that <CC> digraphs could also serve as diacritics for vowels.