diamond anvil

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diamond anvil

[′dī·mənd ′an·vəl]
(engineering)
A brilliant-cut diamond of extremely high quality that is modified to have 16 sides and has the culet cut off to create either a flat tip or a flat surface followed by a bevel of 5-10°.
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The diamond anvil cell pyrolysis of kerogen has the potential to observe the transformation of organic matter of kerogen and reveal many important processes during its heat treatment, which are not recognized using conventional pyrolysis techniques.
Barbara Lavina of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and colleagues synthesized this compound in a diamond anvil cell by smooshing a different compound made of iron, carbon and oxygen.
Together, they produced this remarkable instrument we call the diamond anvil cell.
Diamond anvil cells are common in geochemical research, but using them to study fluids is tricky.
Measuring the electrical conductivity of a material in a diamond anvil cell is tricky.
The researchers created the material on the Pullman campus in a diamond anvil cell, a small, two-inch by three-inch-diameter device capable of producing extremely high pressures in a small space.
Physicists using diamond anvil cells found indications that hydrogen molecules under ultrahigh pressures become a solid and perhaps even a metal (137: 164).
6-megabar pressures in their diamond vises, also known as diamond anvil cells.
The pressure inside builds to levels typically seen inside diamond anvil cells.
After a review of basic concepts of material strength, chapters cover nonferrous alloys, steels and super-alloys, sinter materials, pressure transmitting media, and various types of cells, including liquid/gas and clamp pressure cells, McWhan-type cells, sapphire and diamond anvil cells, uniaxial pressure cells, and Paris-Edinburgh cells.
As for new planets, experimental techniques are being developed on pulsed power facilities, lasers, gas guns and diamond anvil cells to probe the properties of matter under the relevant extreme conditions of pressure and compression.
In order to access the depths of the Earth, scientists have not only seismological images but also a precious experimental technique: diamond anvil cells, coupled with a heating layer.