Diamondback Terrapin


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Diamondback Terrapin

 

(Malaclemys terrapin), a fresh-water turtle. The flattened carapace measures 15–20 cm in length in females, and 10–14 cm in males. The digits are webbed. The diamondback terrapin is found along the eastern seaboard of the USA, where it inhabits salt waters and brackish, swampy waters. It has a lifespan of 20–30 years. The female lays 20–30 eggs per season, which she buries in the ground near shores. The diamondback terrapin feeds on crustaceans, mollusks, and insects. It reproduces well in captivity and is raised for its prized flesh on special farms.

References in periodicals archive ?
However, we assume that TED's will reduce diamondback terrapin catches in crab traps in Louisiana estuaries as documented in other studies; Mazzarella(3) found a 92.
Banning all harvesting is the right thing to do to ensure future generations can continue to enjoy seeing diamondback terrapins in the wild.
Because one goal was to examine the interactions of diamondback terrapin with DCPs, we limited our surveys to nearshore waters with depths [less than or equal to]4 m, where diamondback terrapins and DCPs were most likely to co-occur.
Further notes on the natural history and artificial propagation of the diamondback terrapin.
Nesting ecology and predation of diamondback terrapins, Malaclemys terrapin, at Gateway National Recreation Area, New York.
Metals in tissues of diamondback terrapin from New Jersey.
The Diamondback Terrapin has been a delicacy, a source of state taxes and a casualty of commercial development and victim of new predators, but now its prospects are improved by a UAB-based turtle hatchery that may accelerate the growth of the fledgling population.
The conditions seem excellent for the successful introduction of the diamondback terrapin to the west coast.
11:45 SIZE-CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF NORTHERN DIAMONDBACK TERRAPINS (MALACLEMYS TERRAPIN TERRAPIN) WITHIN A NORTH EAST ATLANTIC SALT MARSH ESTUARY
The northern diamondback terrapin, red fox, snapping turtle, raccoon, rabbit, skunk, opossum and blue crab, all animals that do well living close to people, have adapted nicely to the rapid changes of the Meadowlands.
They also volunteer for the quarterly roadside clean-ups on Big Talbot Island and in 2017, the couple committed to join Team Terrapin, a volunteer team dedicated to monitor diamondback terrapin nesting sites near Big Talbot Island and Sawpit Islands.