dibromochloropropane


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dibromochloropropane

[dī¦brō·mō‚klȯr·ə′prō‚pān]
(organic chemistry)
C3H5Br2Cl A light yellow liquid with a boiling point of 195°C; used as a nematicide for crops. Abbreviated DBCP.
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Among the most commonly occuring chemicals found in large public systems were the volatile organic chemicals (VOC's) tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) and the pesticide dibromochloropropane (DBCP).
In 1981 the Hawaiian pineappls industry was permitted to use the pesticide dibromochloropropane, or DBCP, a carcinogen banned on the mainland by the Environmental Protection Agency in 1979, under a special variance that expired at the beginning of this year.
The saga began in the '70s, when a chemical called dibromochloropropane (DBCP) was found to cause sterility among men.
over injuries they claim are linked to the pesticide dibromochloropropane, the use of which has been banned in the U.
In Nicaragua and in Costa Rica, the current issue is sterility, not of banana plants, but of the workers who regularly labored enshrouded in billows of dibromochloropropane (DBCP).
A few of these compounds include: nitrates, which are ubiquitous and can cause serious health impacts when present in drinking water sources; perchlorate, a constituent of rocket fuel that has been reported in the water supplies of 20 states across the US and has been assigned a California drinking water action level of 6 ppb; chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and dibromochloropropane (DBCP); and other already oxidized compounds.
Chemicals used on bananas include maneb, mancozeb, and benomyl, along with dibromochloropropane, chlorothalonil, and formaldehyde (Wesseling et al.
Men exposed to dibromochloropropane, certain pesticides, alcohol, lead, and solvents, as well as men employed in the aluminum industry and in saw mills, father fewer sons than expected (Davis et al.
Based on an assessment algorithm used by Jarrell (2002), there is reasonably strong evidence linking reduced sex ratios and environmental exposures of dioxin, dibromochloropropane, and hexachlorobenzene (HCB).