Dickens


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Dickens

Charles (John Huffam), pen name Boz. 1812--70, English novelist, famous for the humour and sympathy of his characterization and his criticism of social injustice. His major works include The Pickwick Papers (1837), Oliver Twist (1839), Nicholas Nickleby (1839), Old Curiosity Shop (1840--41), Martin Chuzzlewit (1844), David Copperfield (1850), Bleak House (1853), Little Dorrit (1857), and Great Expectations (1861)
References in classic literature ?
At fifteen Dickens left school and went into a lawyer's office, but he knew that he had learned very little at school, and now set himself to learn more.
People were no longer content with such make-believe reporting, and Dickens proved himself one of the smartest reporters there had ever been.
Besides reporting in the Houses of Parliament Dickens dashed about the country in post-chaises gathering news for his paper, writing by flickering candle-light while his carriage rushed along, at what seemed then the tremendous speed of fifteen miles an hour.
But even while Dickens was leading this hurried, busy life he found time to write other things besides newspaper reports, and little tales and sketches began to appear signed by Boz.
The sketches by Boz were well received, but real fame came to Dickens with the Pickwick Papers which he now began to write.
Like Jonson long before him, Dickens sees every man in his humor.
But when the fun is rather rough, we must remember that Dickens wrote of the England of seventy years ago and more, when life was rougher than it is now, and when people did not see that drinking was the sordid sin we know it to be now.
The glory of Charles Dickens," it has been said, "will always be in his Pickwick, his first, his best, his inimitable triumph.
Just when Dickens began to write Pickwick he married, and soon we find him comfortably settled in a London house, while the other great writers of his day gathered round him as his friends.
Although not born in London, Dickens was a true Londoner, and when his work was done he loved nothing better than to roam the streets.
After Pickwick many other stories followed; in them Dickens showed his power not only of making people laugh, but of making them cry.
In life there is a great deal that is sad, and one of the things which touched Dickens most deeply was the misery of children.