dicotyledon

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Related to Dicots: Monocots

dicotyledon

1. any flowering plant of the class Dicotyledonae, normally having two embryonic seed leaves and leaves with netlike veins. The group includes many herbaceous plants and most families of trees and shrubs
2. primitive dicotyledon. any living relative of early angiosperms that branched off before the evolution of monocotyledons and eudicotyledons. The group comprises about 5 per cent of the world's plants

dicotyledon

[‚dī‚käd·əl′ēd·ən]
(botany)
Any plant of the class Magnoliopsida, all having two cotyledons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence may provide scientific community in depth knowledge about the diversity and prevalence of mastreviruses globally, not only in monocots but also in dicots together with begomoviruses.
Most research in this field has been done with the dicot model plant A.
These variables were selected because previous studies determined that these were important for each species during winter, including vegetation height, litter depth, and cover of dicots, litter, and Aristida (Grzybowski, 1982; Grzybowski, 1983; Reynolds and Krausman, 1998; Dunn and Dunn, 1999; Baldwin et al.
It literally covers any plant that can be infected and regenerated-the trick is that, at the time, the only plants that could be infected and regenerated were dicots.
Results in Table 1 indicated dominance of dicot flora over monocot, and among the dicot families, Fabaceae dominated over others.
The grass matrix consists primarily of mixed polysaccharides of the sugars xylose and arabinose (Carpita 1996); whereas, the matrix of dicots, like poplar and alfalfa, are mostly polysaccharides of glucose, xylose and glucuronic acid as well as diverse and complex pectin polysaccharides.
In some plants, rigidly fixed anthers may have evolved from versatile anthers as bees replaced generalist visitors, being versatile anthers commonly found in both monocots and dicots, in some basal taxonomic groups as well as many advanced ones (D'Arcy, 1996).
Crop plants can be classified as dicots or monocots.
We will report on the presence of p80 homologs in angiosperms, and consider how well it is conserved between dicots and monocots.
The monocots are primarily grasslike plants, and the dicots are broadleaf plants (Figure 2-2).