didgeridoo

(redirected from Didjeridu)
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didgeridoo

Music a deep-toned native Australian wind instrument made from a long hollowed-out piece of wood
References in periodicals archive ?
Later that day, sitting on the floor with the music class, Doyle explained different techniques of playing the didjeridu.
The article on Didjeridu is a fine example of the use of a true expert and practitioner of the art, Mr.
Gasparyan's duduk, taking the role of the optional didjeridu in Sculthorpe's Eleventh Quartet, was simply inaudible against the strings.
Accompanying the Dreaming: determinants of didjeridu style in traditional and popular Yolngu song.
Partial contents of Volumes 7 & 8: "Yanyuwa Women Play Too: Didjeridu Performance at Borroloola, N.
ORIGINATING IN THE ARNHEM LAND region of the top end of northern Australia, today the didjeridu is variously recognized both as a symbol of Yolngu culture and pan-Aboriginal identity and as a distinctly Australian icon.
Washburne is an active freelance studio musician and road warrior as well as master of the trombone, bass trombone, tuba, didjeridu, and various percussion instruments.
For this dance performance, we've got an opera diva, Japanese Taiko drums, an Australian didjeridu (that's a musical instrument) and several jump ropes?
Ken Easton -- whose Down Home Studio was used to record the project -- is also featured, contributing hand percussion to several tracks, as well as didjeridu and folk harp.
This quintet (Harris on trombone and didjeridu, Eddie E.
Other bark paintings depicting stories in which animals with human characteristics feature were also displayed, along with the exquisitely painted ancestral husband and wife figures Wurakak and Warramurungundji, a range of historical photographs, string-bound bark sculptures, and a didjeridu that was made and played by Lazarus Lamilami in the early 1960s.
In the very next sequence of the film (in the Australian Screen clip 1, beginning at the start of chapter 2, at the 3:40 mark, continuing to around the 4:45 mark), where the three main male characters are introduced, traditional indigenous sounds of didjeridu and clapping sticks combine with a rock percussion groove, to provide a standard soundtrack function.