Dies irae


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Dies irae

(dē`ās ē`rā) [Lat.,=day of wrath], hymn of the Roman Catholic Church. A part of the Requiem Mass, it is a powerful description of the Judgment and a prayer to Jesus for mercy. Suggested in part by Zeph. 1.14–16, it was probably written by Thomas of Celano. In 16th-century polyphonic masses it was usually sung to the plain-song melody, but there are a few isolated examples of new music combined with the old melody in masses by minor composers. More recently, it has usually been supplied with new, and frequently intensely dramatic, music, notably by Mozart, Berlioz, and Verdi. It is no longer in general use in Roman Catholic funeral liturgy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nine movements fall into two groups differentiated by harmonic language and gesture: Introitus (1) - Ave rerum corpus (3) - Agnus Dei (6) and Dies irae (2) - Rex tremendae (5) - Tuba mirum (7) - Lacrimosa (8), with the Lux aeterna (4) and Sanctus (9) inhabiting both worlds and acting as midpoint and apotheosis respectively.
The austerity of the Dies Irae was delivered with the right degree of hissing menace, though in the few contemplative moments the choir had too soft an edge compared with the electrifying CBSO.
Jurowski underlines without fuss the score's recourse to the ancient Dies Irae plainchant, a link with so many other works by Rachmaninov including his last great orchestral masterpiece, the Symphonic Dances which follow here.
In compensation there are full-blooded episodes where sheer guts and colour convey the message: the apocalyptic Dies Irae, bass drum to the fore, the jubilant, shrilling Sanctus.
Telling articulation from two timpanists dictated a steady March to the Scaffold, but non-funereal 'wedding bells' were far too cheery for the Dies Irae.
But of course with things like the Dies Irae and the Lacrymosa especially, I think you can't help but be moved at the similarity of mood, if you like.
The acoustic of the hall slightly got the better of them in the iconic Dies Irae - I struggled to catch the voices.
Black-vested priests chant the Dies Irae amidst clouds of incense and the tolling of muffled bells, and Felicity finds yet another murdered body.
Charles Featherstone's came on a true dies irae, beneath the burning towers.
Occasionally this led to some over-deliberate tempi, such as what should be a rampant Dies Irae (perhaps he was governed by the mushy Albert Hall acoustic, though the Coventry Cathedral of 1962 was even worse) and in a Lacrimosa which all but dragged its feet, but certainly in the broadcast detail was always clear (so clear that we could hear the noise of the chorus occasionally retaking their seats).
The use of the plainchant Dies Irae, the Day of Wrath, throughout the movement adds to the scary atmosphere.
The first part, however, is missing the last two pages of the Dies irae (pp.