dietary fiber

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dietary fiber

[¦dī·ə‚ter·ē ′fī·bər]
(food engineering)
The plant-cell-wall polysaccharides and lignin in a food or food ingredient that are not broken down by the digestive enzymes of animals and humans.
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The prototypes that we have taken to our customers show that Promitor branded dietary fibres are easily incorporated into a wide range of food and beverages with no impact on taste.
Unlike some traditional sources of fibre and other forms of resistant starch, it is both enzyme and food processing tolerant and the total dietary fibre level is not affected by most processing conditions.
are a good source of dietary fibre, potassium and vitamins C and A
Effect of dietary fibre on ileal digestibility and endogenous nitrogen losses in the pig.
The project will demonstrate an example of the positive effects stcvia and dietary fibre have on public health issues regarding diabetes and obesity, with up to 90 percent reduction of caloric levels and a remarkable improvement of digestion.
Washington, Jan 20 ( ANI ): A new study has found the sequence of genes that help bacterial communities living in the human gut breakdown a main component of dietary fibre found in the cell walls of fruits and vegetables.
All this waste fibre could be used to boost dietary fibre content of foods.
The two types of dietary fibre caused a general reduction in the levels of all the intestinal enzymes assayed with the effect of dikanut supplementation resulting in more drastic reductions.
Dietary fibre is found in the edible part of plants.
They say drinking red wine in particular can boost levels of dietary fibre in the body, which can ward off stomach and bowel problems in later life.
Dietary fiber or Dietary fibre or sometimes roughage is the indigestible portion of plant foods having two main components:
Many of these foods including meat products lack minimum amounts of dietary fibre (Verma and Banerjee, 2010) to fulfill the recommended dietary intake.