Dysphagia

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dysphagia

[dis′fā·jə]
(medicine)
Difficulty in swallowing, or inability to swallow, of organic or psychic causation.

Dysphagia

 

difficulty in the act of swallowing.

The causes of dysphagia are inflammations of the oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, larynx, and mediastinum; foreign bodies; cicatricial stenoses and tumors; and certain nervous conditions. Swallowing is difficult or impossible and painful. Food or liquid get into the nose, larynx, and trachea. Dysphagia is treated by eliminating the primary condition.

References in periodicals archive ?
A: Some people have difficulty swallowing large pills and some can't even swallow small ones.
The videoscopes will be used to examine patients suffering from various disorders, ranging from difficulty swallowing, difficulty breathing, sleep apnea, asthma, and symptoms of cancer.
In the past, dietary options were very limited for these people, who have difficulty swallowing because of surgery or pre-existing medical conditions.
Other complications that occur include muscle wasting and difficulty swallowing.
The researchers were interested because it has been estimated that 15% of nursing home residents have difficulty swallowing pills and tablets, said Dr.
The sickness can include difficulty swallowing, thirst, low blood pressure, convulsions, cancer, and eventually death.
Coughing, difficulty swallowing, or difficulty breathing would be likely to show up within 3-4 hours.
Symptoms may include anxiety, insomnia, partial paralysis, hallucinations and difficulty swallowing.
Four weeks later, the man became ill with a temperature up to 39[degrees]C, malaise, pain in the right arm, headache, feeling of extreme dryness in the mouth, and difficulty swallowing.
New research has shown that around one in ten people have difficulty swallowing solid medicines and as a result may crush tablets, open capsules or miss taking their medicine altogether.
During the final weeks of radiation therapy, she began to experience difficulty swallowing.
Gould then axed Flynn from his beloved role with the Welsh Under-21s - a bitter pill that the Welshman has difficulty swallowing even now.