DAD

(redirected from Diffuse Alveolar Damage)
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DAD

(1) (Database Action Diagram) Documentation that describes the processing performed on data in a database.

(2) (Digital Audio Disc) See CD.

DAD

On drawings, abbr. for double-acting door.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acute lupus pneumonitis is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage, with or without diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, varying degrees of interstitial inflammation, and edema (Figure 9).
Intratracheal infection of domestic cats with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus resulted in mild-to-moderate clinical signs and virus replication throughout the respiratory tract, which caused diffuse alveolar damage.
Qualitatively, all alterations characterizing the exudative phase of the histopathologic condition termed diffuse alveolar damage were identifiable, with intense congestion of the alveolar capillaries, marginated intracapillary neutrophils, necrosis of the alveolar epithelium, interstitial and alveolar edema, hyaline membranes, and invasion of the alveoli by (mostly) mononucleate cells.
9) In the second case, postmortem examination 3 weeks subsequent to receiving silicone injections revealed diffuse alveolar damage and a foreign body reaction to silicone microemboli.
There are several histologic patterns that may occur, including diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, diffuse alveolar damage, and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia.
Diffuse alveolar damage is the classic histologic manifestation of ALI/ARDS.
Conditions Most Commonly Associated With Diffuse Alveolar Damage Shock Infections (viral, fungal, bacterial, parasitic) Toxic inhalants Acute allergic reactions (eg, hypersensitivity pneumonitis) Drug reactions Systemic collagen vascular diseases Radiation reactions (acute) Alveolar hemorrhage syndromes Idiopathic disease (acute interstitial pneumonia) Table 2.
Diffuse alveolar damage refers to the pathologic description of lung injury due to a wide variety of causative agents; and the lung tissue generally responds to the injury in a similar manner regardless of the causative agent.
1-4] When examined histologically, the lungs of 13% of these lupus patients show a neutrophilic capillaritis, and in another 13% of the lupus patients, the pulmonary pathology consists of diffuse alveolar damage.
Hyperplasia of type II pneumocytes develops as a response to alveolar injury in a variety of pulmonary disorders, especially in the setting of inflammation and interstitial fibrosis and during the healing phase of diffuse alveolar damage.
The pathologic findings of AIP are characterized by acute and organizing diffuse alveolar damage.