Diffuseness


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Diffuseness

A measure of a light’s dispersion as it travels from the source. Diffused light is useful for general lighting purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The very permission to publish indicates some deep connection between political power and narrative diffuseness.
But the diffuseness of culture circa 2007 obscures the rallying points.
The work of the lunch-time assistants, in its diffuseness, is reminiscent of mothering at home.
The diffuseness and eclectic nature of this thought creates problems when it comes to handling his beliefs, but the author has succeeded in welding his views into a coherent whole, in the process producing a thoughtful and well-argued appraisal of them.
Perhaps the degree of diffuseness of pain and the cyclic nature of pain may help guide us in the future in terms of treatment," she said.
of privacy, (52) the diffuseness of modern American society, as well as
Finally, he avoids the softness and diffuseness of the early sonnets not only through this metrical weightedness but also through compact sentences and the placement of punctuation after stressed syllables.
Apparently the diffuseness of Science and Sanity has concealed the fact that it is mainly concerned with an attempt to formulate "a thorough theory of the organization of behavioral word and cosmic fact.
The ambition of this collection to cover so much ground leads to a diffuseness that may bewilder the reader.
Sculpture conceived as an expression of an artist's peculiar preoccupations and passions makes it in some ways unsuited to a garden or landscape, where the ambiguity, mutability and diffuseness of the outdoor setting can make object-based art seem ponderous.
Chansky asserts that despite the heterogeneity, diversity, and diffuseness which characterized Little Theatre, efforts to produce serious as opposed to commercial, dramas in the United States did share some common traits, among them the commitment to develop an audience for such plays by doing theatre in venues friendly to nontraditional theatre goers (children, students, poor people, immigrants, and farmers), the influence of European models (the Irish Players, the Moscow Art Theatre), and the nurturing of new American playwrights.