diffusion of innovations


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diffusion of innovations

the adoption, and the social processes involved in the adoption, of technical innovations, new fashions, etc. One focus has been on the social and psychological characteristics of those who adopt innovations. Thus, Rogers (1983) proposed a three-stage model in which a relatively small number of people attuned to new developments in a field initially adopt the innovation, paving the way for the innovation to be adopted, in the medium-term, by a broad majority of the relevant population, but leaving a group of conservatives who either ignore or actively resist the innovation. A further focus is on ‘innovative forms’ (the extent of innovation involved in particular innovations, e.g. ‘incremental’, ‘radical’, ‘technology systems’, and ‘technoeconomic paradigm’ innovations in microprocessor technology) and on technical characteristics of the innovation which influence its range of application and take-up, e.g. while in the 1980s, 60% of all manufacturing establishments reported using microtechnology at some point in the production process, only 12.5% had incorporated such technology in their products (Northcott, 1988). Wider cultural and political factors, e.g. economic conditions, management strategies, traditions of industrial relations, also shape the detailed take-up of new technology
References in periodicals archive ?
Accelerating the Diffusion of Innovations Using Opinion Leaders", in: The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 566, pp.
After a parenthesis of several decades during which the role of mass media in the creation of public opinion was considered predominant ("the hypodermic needle theory", 1927; "two-step flow of communication theory", 1955), the diffusion of innovations theory (Rogers, 1962) constituted a novelty due to its emphasis on the role played by social contagion.
Studies on perceived attributes of innovation (15,16) have been widely influenced by Rogers' Diffusion of innovation model (17) which suggested 5 "standard" attributes, 4 of which seemed more relevant with regard to HS: 1) Relative advantages, the degree to which an innovation is perceived as an improvement compared to the idea or program it supersedes; 2) Compatibility, the degree to which an innovation is perceived as consistent with existing values, experiences and needs of potential adopters; 3) Complexity, the degree to which an innovation is perceived as complex to understand and use; and 4) Observability of benefits, the degree to which the benefits of an innovation are visible to intended adopters.
Does the diffusion of innovations in the counseling profession follow the same S-shaped curve as has been demonstrated in other fields?
Hassan is recognized internationally for research on strategic brand management, consumer marketing, and diffusion of innovations.
Key words: Diffusion of innovations, evidence-based practice, research utilization, theoretical frameworks, dental hygienists
The applications of the diffusion of innovations theory in public health, health promotion, and health education began with immunization campaigns and family planning programs.
Rogers' theory of diffusion of innovations (2) may hold some promise for developing an understanding of knowledge transfer in dental hygiene, and has already been used to study the information-seeking behaviours among dental hygienists.
Perhaps the pre-eminent expert in diffusion of innovations is Everett Rogers (2003).
Understanding the origins of profound military change thus calls for understanding the emergence and diffusion of innovations.
Rogers in 1962 and refined and repeated in subsequent editions of his seminal work, Diffusion of innovations (1962, 1971 [under a different title with coauthor F.
In the general diffusion of innovations as well as in public policy diffusion, the process may transpire in a relatively coherent fashion, with those adopting a policy having internal characteristics that make the adoption appear very standard.

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