Digambara


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Related to Digambara: Svetambara

Digambara

ascetic Jainist sect whose members went naked. [Jainism: NCE, 1392]
See: Nudity
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, the Civakacintamani written by the Digambara Tiruttakkatevar probably in the ninth century, one of the best-known Tamil epics, tells how King Jivaka (or Jivandhara), after marrying eight wives, finally abandons them all and becomes a Jaina monk in the preaching arena (samavasarana) of Mahavira (tr.
As mentioned above, the Salvi weavers of the patola originally came from the Deccan and probably also the western coastal Karnataka area, which was a well known centre of Digambara Jams.
But Digambara Jains throughout central India, at sites such as Gwalior, Sihauniya, Sonagiri, Bina Baraha, Patnaganj, Kundalpur, Gandharvpuri, Culagiri, and Ramtek (see photos in Bharat ke Digambar Jain Tirth, ed.
According to the Digambara sect, this was a conscious decision.
In this article the general tendency of the Jaina's epistemic pluralism is discussed and it is shown how the Digambara Jaina Vidyanandin tries to establish the Jainas' pluralism on rational grounds by identifying erroneous epistemic alternatives through methodological falsification.
tu maya raghundtha kl, khelana carhi ahedaim catura cikare cuni cuni mare, kol na chodya nedaim muniyara ptra digambara mare, jatana karamta jogl jamgala mahi kejamgama mare, turn re phirai balivamtlm veda parhamta bdmhana mard, seva karamta svami aratha karamta misara pacharyd, turn re phire maimamtlm sdkhita [sdkata] kai turn harata karata, had bhagatana kai cerl dasa kablra ramma kai saranai, jyom lagi tyom pherl (tori) (KG pada 161 (187) = B12) You Sorceress of Raghunath, you have gone off to play the game of hunt: Wily, you choose the deer and kill; you don't miss any nearby.
In contrast to Jina images worshiped in Svetambara contexts, Digambara sculptures present the Jina without any form of ornamentation.
Similarly named, much shorter texts are found among the Digambara Jains, but they have remained virtually unknown to scholarship.
It is, however, unclear why the Jina Rsabha's son Bahubali is cited with reference to his role in Digambara mythology and his celebrated representation at Sravana Belgola, since he is mentioned cursorily in the Thanamgasutta and the Samavayamgusutta, with the medieval Svetambara commentarial literature on the Avassayasutta (admitted outside the textual range of this dictionary) producing the first developed version of his biography.
In "A Fifteenth-Century Digambar Mystic and His Followers: Taran Taran Svami and the Taran Svami Panth," Cort provides (on the basis of both textual analysis and fieldwork) what is at present the most academically exhaustive historical, biographical, and doctrinal overview of this little-studied Digambara tradition and its founder, examining in detail various biographical reconstructions of Taran Svami together with their implicit motives.
Most accounts of the Jains have included mention of the long-standing distinction between Digambara and Svetambara, and many have further specified that the latter is divided into three separate groups, the Murtipujakas, Sthanakavasis, and Terapanthis.
Some of them, such as the southern Digambara philosopher Samantabhadra (whom he dates to c.