Dijon

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Dijon

(dēzhôN`), city (1990 pop. 151,636), capital of Côte-d'Or dept., E France, the old capital of BurgundyBurgundy
, Fr. Bourgogne , historic region, E France. The name once applied to a large area embracing several kingdoms, a free county (see Franche-Comté), and a duchy. The present region is identical with the province of Burgundy of the 17th and 18th cent.
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. It is a transportation hub and industrial center with food, metal-products, and electronics industries. Its mustard and cassis (black currant liqueur) are famous, and Dijon is also an important shipper of Burgundy wine. It is at least equally noteworthy for its art treasures.

Founded in ancient times, Dijon flourished when the rulers of Burgundy made it their residence (11th cent.); after Burgundy was reunited with France (late 15th cent.), Dijon remained a thriving cultural center. The orator and writer BossuetBossuet, Jacques Bénigne
, 1627–1704, French prelate, one of the greatest orators in French history. At an early age he was made a canon at Metz; he became bishop of Condom and was (1670–81) tutor to the dauphin (father of Louis XV), for whom he wrote his
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 and the composer RameauRameau, Jean Philippe
, 1683–1764, French composer and theorist. He was organist at the cathedral in Clermont and at Notre Dame de Dijon. In the early part of his career his wrote two treatises on harmony (1722, 1726) in which he introduced the important and influential
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 were among the noted figures born in the city. Dijon Univ. was founded in 1722. RousseauRousseau, Jean Jacques
, 1712–78, Swiss-French philosopher, author, political theorist, and composer. Life and Works

Rousseau was born at Geneva, the son of a Calvinist watchmaker.
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's prizewinning essay written for the Academy of Dijon in 1749 made him famous.

Among the city's art treasures are the funeral statues of the dukes of Burgundy by Claus SluterSluter, Claus
, d. 1406, Flemish sculptor, probably of Dutch extraction, active in Burgundy. Under Philip the Bold of Burgundy he had charge of the sculptural works for the porch of the Chartreuse of Champmol, near Dijon; there stands his pedestal for a Calvary—the
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 and his disciples, housed in the town hall, originally the 12th-century ducal palace. Noted buildings in Dijon include the Cathedral of St. Bénigne (13th–14th cent.), the Church of Notre Dame (13th cent., in Burgundian Gothic), St. Michael's Church (Renaissance), the Hôtel Aubriot (14th cent.; now containing a museum of Burgundian folklore), and the palace of justice (15th–16th cent.), which once housed the powerful parliament of Burgundy. A 1990s building campaign has produced modern foci like the new performing arts center.

Dijon

 

a city in central France. Administrative center of Côte-d’Or Department. Ancient capital and economic center of Burgundy. Population, 145,000 (1968; including suburbs, 184,000). Port on the Burgundy Canal; railroad junction. Dijon has mechanical engineering, chemical, food, and woodworking industries and is famous as a center for the production of Burgundy wines. Its university was founded in 1722.

The architectural monuments of Dijon include the Cathedral of St. Benigne (crypt, tenth to 11th centuries, upper Gothic church, 1281-1325), the Romanesque Church of St. Philibert (12th century), the Gothic Church of Notre Dame (13th century) and the Renaissance Church of St. Michel (1499-1530); the palace of the dukes of Burgundy (14th to 18th centuries), which now houses the town hall and the Museum of Fine Arts; the ruins of the Champmol Monastery (1383-88), with its sculptures by Claus Sluter; the Palace of Justice (15th to 16th centuries); and the classical private residence Boue de Lanthane (1759).

REFERENCE

Boireau, R.-L. Guide pratique: Dijon et la Côte-d’Or. Dijon, 1954.

Dijon

a city in E France: capital of the former duchy of Burgundy. Pop.: 149 867 (1999)
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors gratefully acknowledge the parents and children for welcoming our research, as well as the directors of the Clos Chauveau and of the Maisons des Jeunes et de la Culture (Gresilles, Maladiere, and Montchapet) in Dijon, France.
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Diawara played eight games for a professional team in Dijon, France, as a teenager, receiving per diem expenses, the school said.
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Early in his career, he was an assistant professor of physics at the University of Dijon in Dijon, France.
The show came on the heels of the artist's solo presentation at Le Consortium in Dijon, France, this past spring and was his first solo museum exhibition in the US since a 1996 midcareer survey organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
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The fish was caught by British angler Ambrose Smith at a lake in Dijon, France, in June this year.
An American scholar of visual art in late medieval and early modern Europe, Lindquist explains how the art and architecture of a particular Carthusian monastery charterhouse in Dijon, France served to define and enforce the social categories of male and female, lay and religious, and public and private.
point out in the July 1 ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL that the first to note the 1670 nova was apparently the Carthusian monk Pere Dom Anthelme of Dijon, France.
He also studied at the Universite de Dijon, France and is a Certified Public Accountant.