Diluvium


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Diluvium

 

an obsolete term that was used in geology as a synonym for the Pleistocene epoch. In Soviet geology the term has passed out of use, although many German scientists continue to use it. It was proposed in 1823 by Buckland, who thought that the Quaternary sediments had been caused by the Biblical flood.

References in periodicals archive ?
The diluvium resulting from such an event was distinguished from alluvium along river courses, obviously the product of actual causes.
Even as geologists continued to debate the nature of the causes that produced the diluvium, Lyell issued volume 1 of Principles of Geology in 1830.
He explained the diluvium in terms of modern processes, such as the melting of icebergs at a time of higher sea level or the breaking of ice dams in the Alpine region, rather than a gigantic deluge.
Geology of the bridge site includes layered alluvium and diluvium deposits over what is called the hard Akashi or Kobe layer.