Dimensionless Quantities

Dimensionless Quantities

 

derived physical quantities which are independent of the simultaneous variation of quantities that are chosen to be fundamental. If, for example, one chooses length L, mass M, and time T as the fundamental quantities and their simultaneous variations have no effect on the value of a given quantity, then the dimensionality of such a quantity is equal to L0M0T0 = 1, and the quantity is dimensionless in this system of quantities. For example, a plane angle, defined as the ratio of the length of the arc of a circle enclosed between two radii to the length of the radius, is a dimensionless quantity in the LMT system, because it is independent of the length of the radius. All relative quantities—that is, relative density (the density of an object in relation to the density of water), relative elongation, relative magnetic and dielectric permeability, and the like—as well as similarity criteria (Reynolds number and Prandtl number), are also considered dimensionless quantities. Dimensionless quantities are expressed in abstract units. Relative quantities are also expressed in percent (%) and in parts per thousand (‰).

K. P. SHIROKOV

References in periodicals archive ?
Inserting the dimensionless quantities from Table 2 into Eq.
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2), all the parameters of expressions (14), (15) and (16) are brought to dimensionless quantities.
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This book offers the most comprehensive and up to date resource for dimensionless quantities, providing not only a summary of the quantities, but also a clarification of their physical principles, areas of use, and other specific properties across multiple relevant fields.
Through the application of dimensionless quantities we get: