Dinard


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Dinard

(dēnär`), town (1990 pop. 10,341), Îlle-et-Vilaine dept., NW France, in Brittany, on an inlet of the English Channel. Formerly a small fishing village, it is now a popular beach resort.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: Formalized procedure: call manager for halting sites for travellers in the community of communes emerald coast pleurtuit (35) dinard (35) and ploubalay (22)
Escape to Dinard on Brittany's Cote d'Emeraude on a mini-break costing from PS99pp.
COWES, England, April 1, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Lending Club(NYSE: LC), the world's largest marketplace connecting borrowers and investors, today announced that CEO Renaud Laplanche and co-skipper Ryan Breymaier established a new world speed sailing record across the English Channel from the Royal Yacht Squadron Cowes, Isle of Wight to Dinard, France in 5 hours, 15 minutes, subject to ratification by the World Speed Sailing Record Council (WSSRC) aboard their 105-foot offshore trimaran "Lending Club 2" at an average speed of 26.
The group employs more than 3,000 persons in 18 sites worldwide, including Bordeaux, Brussels, Dinard, Marseille, Miami, Monastir, Nimes and Papeete.
We took day five off the bikes and went for a wander around Dinard with its galleries, shops and fabulous market.
com ) flies to Dinard from East Midlands and London Stansted.
But the vast beaches of Dinard are well worth visiting, as is the pretty cathedral town of Dol-de-Bretagne, which has plenty of parking available and your quintessential French cafs and bistros.
At 19 I graduated from the prestigious Catering College Le Touquet and began my professional career in the Grand Hotel Dinard in Brittany, specialising in traditional seafood.
Golf de Dinard is just one of the impressive coastal courses available in the popular holiday region.
The new routes will be to Chania in Crete, Corfu, Dinard, Kos, Milan and Tenerife.
The sands are lined with traditional little blue and white huts and it's no surprise to find Dinard was a haven for the English aristocracy in the late 19th century when it was known as the "Cannes of the North".