Dinarides


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Dinarides

[di′nar·ə‚dēz]
(geography)
A mountain system, east of the Adriatic Sea, in Yugoslavia.
References in periodicals archive ?
2012, On the formation and evolution of the Pannonian Basin: constraints derived from the structure of the junction area between the Carpathians and Dinarides.
To explain this" - adds the lead author Pier [ETH]auro Ciachino, from Torino, Italy - "we must go back at least to the Late Oligocene (29-24 million years) where a continuum of land connected the Dinarides and Rhodopes mountains, allowing colonization by this phyletic lineage.
In contrast to inner Dinarides, silver fir in the sub-Mediterranean zone grows on mountain tops or just below them, and it has lost a possibility of further migration in suitable conditions.
The Dinaric thrust systems are post-Eocene, representing a NW-SE striking fold-and-thrust belt that can be followed from the Istra peninsula towards central Slovenia (Vrabec and Fodor, 2006) and that belongs to the External Dinarides.
Variscan faulting axes generally trend northeast-southwest and are therefore perpendicular to the normal faulting axes of the Dinarides.
The studied area is part of Adria microplate South from Periadriatic Fault and belongs to External Dinarides that are characterized by moderate historic and recent seismicity.
Around the Mediterranean sea, the Alps, Apennin, Dinarides, Hellenides, Taurides and Pontides are linked to the Tethyan Cenozoic tectonics.
There is an irregular string of ranges across the south of Europe, from the Pyrenees and Betics to the Alps, the Carpathians, the Balkans, the Dinarides and the Taurides, and across Turkey linking up with the Caucasus and beyond, inside Asia and towards the Himalayas.
The purpose of our project is to better understand the active fault systems of NW Slovenia and processes of fault propagation, earthquake nucleation, and displacement transfer between the Dinarides and SE Alpine mountain chains (Fig.
Slovenia is situated at the NE boundary of the Adriatic microplate, at the junction of three major geotectonic units: the Alps, the Dinarides and the Pannonian basin.