Dingiswayo


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Dingiswayo

 

Date of birth unknown; died 1818. Leader after 1808 of the Mthethwa clan of the Zulus, who had settled in the valley of the Umfolozi River in southern Africa. Dingiswayo significantly strengthened the troops of the Mthethwa clan by reorganizing the army and improving the training of soldiers. He created an alliance of the tribes who inhabited the region between the Pongola and Tugela rivers. Dingiswayo headed the Zulus’ preparations for armed resistance to the English and Boer colonizers, who were attempting to seize land that belonged to the Zulus. Dingiswayo’s work was continued by one of his closest assistants, Shaka (Chaka).

References in periodicals archive ?
In exile, Chaka accepts the protection of a more powerful and benevolent king, Dingiswayo, and assists him in defeating the ruthless and cruel king Zwide.
While Dingiswayo balances the agricultural prosperity of his kingdom with its defense, Chaka will turn every element toward the development of a military machine.
After Chaka defeats his armies, "Zwide was captured alive and taken to Dingiswayo, because Dingiswayo did not permit a king to be killed" (Chaka: a New Translation 65).
At the earliest opportunity, he launches a surprise attack on Dingiswayo, who, like Zwide, is captured.
This can be identified as a historical novel, because the main characters (Jobe, Dingiswayo, Zwide) are historically attested and the narrated events had a bearing in shaping the history of the Zulu nation during the reign of Dingiswayo, the Mthethwa king, protector and mentor of young Shaka.
On his enthronement he changed his name to Dingiswayo ("The needy one") and began to reign wisely.
Dingiswayo understood the precarious position of his territory, squeezed between Portuguese Mozambique and the British Cape Colony, and saw the need to strengthen the Mthethwa to enable them to resist possible incursions from north or south.
Minor characters are Malusi, whose death causes the great Mthethwa-Ndwandwe war in which Dingiswayo is killed; Jobe, Godongwane's murderous father; Dingiwe, Godongwane's sister; and a few others.
His natural father Yohane Banda - now happily remarried - is celebrating the birth of son Dingiswayo on July 19.
While David can look forward to luxury and privilege, Dingiswayo faces a life of struggle.
With the arrival of Dingiswayo he believes he can offer a David a more stable upbringing.
17), to lure Dingiswayo, chief of the Mthethwa clan, to his death.