Dinka

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Dinka

 

(self-designation, Jang), a people living in the southern part of the Republic of the Sudan, on both banks of the White Nile and in the basin of the Mountain Nile (Bahr al Jabal). The language of the Dinkas belongs to the northwestern group of the Nilotic languages. Population, approximately 1.8 million (1970, estimate). Most Dinkas have preserved their ancient traditional beliefs; some are Christians. Their chief occupations are livestock raising (cattle, sheep, and goats) and, to a lesser extent, hoe farming (durra, vegetables, and tobacco). A small number of Dinkas work on plantations and in industrial enterprises.

REFERENCE

Butt, A. The Nilotes of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan and Uganda. London, 1952.

Dinka

 

the language of the Dinka people. It is related to the northwestern group of the Nilotic languages. It is spoken in the southern part of the Sudan by approximately 1.8 million people (1970, estimate).

References in periodicals archive ?
Examples from the indigenous religions of the Nuer, Shilluk, Atout, and Dinka, will help explain how a group's religious beliefs and attitudes influence that group's notions of justice and, where possible, how victims and offenders should be treated.
In addition, southerners were forbidden from speaking any Arabic and were only allowed to speak either English or certain local languages like those of the Dinka, Bari, Nuer, Shilluk and Zande peoples (Teny-Dhurgon).
Although the Nuer believe that some people are given "ritual powers" and that God has established a chain of circumstances in which "the Nuer should raid the Dinka and that Europeans should conquer the Nuer," it is their nature to believe that Spirit has compassion and will "even things out.
When he arrived at Seattle-Tacoma Airport in December 2000 with eight other Lost Boys, Guot had almost nothing with him except a few pieces of inadequate clothing and copies of the Old and New Testaments and a Dinka hymnal, all worn by constant reading.
Dinka society is male-dominated, and he still chafes when Diana Owens asks him to do something.
He is grateful for the generosity he has encountered in this country, but he is not a Dinka waiting to become an American citizen.
In February-March 1996 raids of Misiriya Arabs with PDF militias attacked Dinka in Gogrial and Abyei in which men were killed, cattle were taken, and women and children taken as slaves.
His reports renewed the charges of slavery in the Sudan, especially by the Iranian-trained PDF (Finnegan 1999: 56) who are mainly the Rizeigat and Missiriya Arabs who occupy the lands just north of the Dinka of Bahr al-Ghazal.
In fact, as the story unraveled the 'Arab' liberator (perhaps Doka Awut, by true name) had himself been born of a Dinka mother and an Arab father.
The Dinka are the largest ethnic group in the Sudan, numbering several million in a country of around 20 million people and several hundred tribes.
Although the Dinka are mainly known to the outside world as devoted owners of cattle, they are also cultivators.
On balance, however, the Dinka derive their distinctive socioeconomic identity, cultural values and institutions from their preoccupation with cattle.