Dinka

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Dinka

 

(self-designation, Jang), a people living in the southern part of the Republic of the Sudan, on both banks of the White Nile and in the basin of the Mountain Nile (Bahr al Jabal). The language of the Dinkas belongs to the northwestern group of the Nilotic languages. Population, approximately 1.8 million (1970, estimate). Most Dinkas have preserved their ancient traditional beliefs; some are Christians. Their chief occupations are livestock raising (cattle, sheep, and goats) and, to a lesser extent, hoe farming (durra, vegetables, and tobacco). A small number of Dinkas work on plantations and in industrial enterprises.

REFERENCE

Butt, A. The Nilotes of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan and Uganda. London, 1952.

Dinka

 

the language of the Dinka people. It is related to the northwestern group of the Nilotic languages. It is spoken in the southern part of the Sudan by approximately 1.8 million people (1970, estimate).

References in periodicals archive ?
When he arrived at Seattle-Tacoma Airport in December 2000 with eight other Lost Boys, Guot had almost nothing with him except a few pieces of inadequate clothing and copies of the Old and New Testaments and a Dinka hymnal, all worn by constant reading.
Dinka society is male-dominated, and he still chafes when Diana Owens asks him to do something.
He is grateful for the generosity he has encountered in this country, but he is not a Dinka waiting to become an American citizen.
For Chief Madhol and other western Dinka, the heart of the dilemma was whether puk could still recreate life after death.
Among the western Dinka, there are no necessary, clear boundaries between the social meanings of lethal violence in incidents of homicide and those of deaths during times of war.
Since the early twentieth century, western Dinka regimes of compensation and revenge have been progressively secularized and bound up with government authority through the chiefs' courts.
Biographies collected by Sandler tell of Malwal Akec a Dinka from Turalei who was captured by murahileen near Abyei.
In February-March 1996 raids of Misiriya Arabs with PDF militias attacked Dinka in Gogrial and Abyei in which men were killed, cattle were taken, and women and children taken as slaves.
In order to appreciate Dinka self-perception, their world view and cross-cultural perspectives on their material status, it is necessary to understand the indigenous cultural framework of their values, institutions and patterns of behavior.
The Dinka are the largest ethnic group in the Sudan, numbering several million in a country of around 20 million people and several hundred tribes.
Rather, Islam was rejected for centuries because, as a life-system, it could not be utilized within the structures of the Dinka political, cultural, or religious society.
Part II will argue that the Dinka political, cultural, and religious institutions, up to 1956 (Sudan's independence), were not in a position to integrate with that of the Northern Sudanese Islamic state.