Dio Cassius


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Dio Cassius

(Cassius Dio Cocceianus) (dīo kăsh`əs), c.155–235?, Roman historian and administrator, b. Nicaea in Bithynia. He was a grandson of Dio Chrysostom. His rise in civil and military office was steady; he became a senator (c.180), praetor (193), consul (220?), proconsul in Africa (224), legate in Dalmatia (226), legate in Pannonia (227), and consul again (229). He was a good commander, but he remained in favor more for his literary works than for his abilities in office. His great work, partially extant, was a history of Rome (written in Greek) from the earliest times until Dio Cassius' own period. Of the original 80 books, 19 survive in full. They are a reputable source for the period of the later republic and the first two centuries A.D. Dio Cassius tried earnestly to study all available sources in the light of a moderate skepticism.

Dio Cassius

 

(Cassius Dion Cocceianus). Born between A.D. 155 and 164, in Nicaea; died there after 229. Ancient Greek historian.

The son of a provincial aristocrat, Dio Cassius rose to the position of a Roman senator during the reign of Emperor Commodius and held several high governmental positions. After 229 he retired from affairs of state and returned to Nicaea. Dio Cassius was the author of the work Roman History, consisting of 80 books written in Greek and covering the history of Rome from the most ancient times to 229. The exposition of events is by years (by consuls), based on the principle of annals. Books 36-54 (from the year 68 through 10 B.C.) have come down to us in their entirety, books 55-60 (9 B.C.-A.D. 46) in abbreviated form, and books 17 and 79-80 in fragments. The remaining content is known through abridgments and extracts compiled by Byzantine historians, including Xiphilinus (11th century) and Joannes Zonaras (12th century).

Dio Cassius subordinated the exposition of facts to his endeavor to dramatize the narrative and his predilection for rhetoric and generalizing judgments. This was especially damaging to the books on the history of the Republic, a period whose intricacies evidently escaped Dio Cassius. He illuminated events from the point of view of a convinced supporter of the monarchy, although he was also an opponent of the extreme manifestations of despotism. In language and style he imitated Thucydides.

WORKS

Casii Dionis Cocceiani Historiarum Romanorum quae supersunt,vols. 1-5. Edited by U. T. Boisevain. Berlin, 1895-1931.
In Russian translation:
“Rimskaia istoriia.” In Pozdniaia grecheskaia proza. Moscow, 1961.

Dio Cassius

?155--?230 ad, Roman historian. His History of Rome covers the period of Rome's transition from Republic to Empire
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Caracalla, the Roman historian Dio Cassius tells us, was probably history's most extreme cat lover: his pet lion Acinaces shared the emperor's table, and even his bed.
The account of the rebellion derived from Tacitus and Dio Cassius and the associated archaeological evidence is covered, as are aspects of the archaeology of the Iceni themselves; however, as is so often the case, the Iceni are seen mainly through the prism of the revolt.
Ancient Roman historian Dio Cassius, one of the few sources we have on the second rebellion, states that the Jewish uprising against Rome was ignited by the provocative plan of Hadrian, the Roman emperor, to raise a temple to Jupiter in Jerusalem on the Temple Mount and convert the former Jewish capital into a Roman colony.
The Emperor then was Antoninus Pius (138-161), described by the third-century pagan historian Dio Cassius as "showing the Christians great respect.
The Batavian horsemen and all the Batavians excelled from ancient times among the tribes of Germania Inferior in horsemanship, as appears from Plutarch, Tacitus, Dio Cassius, and other authors.
The analysis of Augustus' use of spectacle is particularly good, but the discussion of Tiberius, Caligula, and Claudius often devolves into a simple retelling of what Suetonius, Tacitus, and Dio Cassius have said, without deeper investigation or critical assessment.
Many of the candidates are in Franche-Comte, a territorial attribution supported by the Roman historian Dio Cassius, writing some three centuries after the Gallic Wars, who located the siege in the modern region of the Jura.
Discussing the campaigns of Julius Caesar in Gaul and Britain, Morrison quotes the 3rd-century AD historian Dio Cassius (xxxix: 40) as saying, 'Decimus Brutus arrived [in Brittany] with fast ships from the Mediterranean'.