Dio Chrysostom


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Dio Chrysostom

(dīo krĭs`əstəm, krĭsŏs`–), d. after A.D. 112, Greek Sophist and orator [Chrysostom=golden-mouthed], b. Prusa (modern Bursa) in Bithynia. He lived at Rome under Emperor Domitian, who subsequently banished him. He traveled widely, finally returning to Rome in the favor of emperors Nerva and Trajan. He leaned toward the philosophy of the Cynics and Stoics. With Plutarch he shared in the revival of Greek literature in the 1st cent. Extant are 80 orations on literary, political, and philosophical subjects.

Dio Chrysostom

2nd century ad, Greek orator and philosopher
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, Pseudo-Diogenes as well as Dio Chrysostom evidently interpret the anecdote, while Plutarch adds to it for purposes of his own.
In an oration of Dio Chrysostom, where he makes Diogenes comment on various aspects of Alexander's behaviour, the philosopher stresses the superiority of natural emblems of kingship.
35) Apparently Dio Chrysostom disagrees (or is unfamiliar) with Pliny the Elder, according to whom the king bee had the emblem of a diadem around his head, exactly like a human sovereign (supra).
In this article, we will focus on ten Greek and Roman writers who mentioned the king bee, namely Plato, Xenophon, Aristotle, Varro, Virgil, Seneca the Younger, Columella, Pliny the Elder, Dio Chrysostom and Aelian.
Their topics include places for history in the sociology of religion, the history of meaning, indigenous leadership and party politics among the Amasiri of southeastern Nigeria, the development and major problems of religious legislation in Taiwan, developing a historical sociology of nationalism and state secularization in Latin America, Dio Chrysostom and the pragmatist motif in representing divinity, and creating discourses on religion at the US State Department.