Diodorus Siculus


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Diodorus Siculus

(dīədôr`əs sĭk`yo͞oləs), d. after 21 B.C., Sicilian historian. He wrote, in Greek, a world history in 40 books, ending with Caesar's Gallic Wars. Fully preserved are Books I–V and XI–XX, which cover Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Indian, Scythian, Arabian, and North African history and parts of Greek and Roman history. The history, which is a compilation of other sources, is often repetitive and contradictory. Historians generally regard it as uncritical and unreliable. It is valuable, however, as a source for the lost works of earlier authors, from whom he borrowed freely, and for his chronological lists of prominent figures from the 5th cent. to 302 B.C.

Diodorus Siculus

 

Born circa 90 B.C. in Agyrium, Sicily; died 21 B.C. Ancient Greek historian.

Diodorus was the author of the 40-volume work The Historical Library, of which only volumes 1-5 and 11-20 and fragments of the remaining volumes have survived. This work presents a synchronous account of the history of the ancient East, Greece, the Hellenistic states, and Rome from legendary times to the middle of the first century B.C. Even though Diodorus’ works are mere compilations, and chronologically inaccurate, they have a certain value owing to their use of several sources lost in ancient times. Of particular interest is the information on the classical period of Greek history, the description of the reigns of the emperors Philip II and Alexander the Great, and the reports of the slave uprisings in Sicily in the second century B.C.

WORKS

Diodori Bibliotheca historica, vols. 1-5. Edited by J. Teubner. Leipzig, 1888-1906.
In Russian translation:
In Istoricheskaia biblioteka, vols. 1-6. St. Petersburg, 1774-75.
References in classic literature ?
I then questioned the Mummy about burning-glasses and lenses, and, in general, about the manufacture of glass; but I had not made an end of my queries before the silent member again touched me quietly on the elbow, and begged me for God's sake to take a peep at Diodorus Siculus.
Diodorus Siculus, a Greek historian of the first century BC, is known for writing a monumental universal history, Historical Library.
The primary sources for our study of Phoenicia have traditionally been Josephus and Menander of Ephesus (who quote extinct "Annals of Tyre"), the Old Testament, and the Greek and Roman historians Herodotus, Xenophon, Diodorus Siculus, Arrian, Eusebius of Caesarea, and Philo of Byblos.
Diodorus Siculus Bibliotheca Historica (Loeb Classical Library).
Another Greek historian, Diodorus Siculus, describes an example of swift justice for the killer of a cat.
It includes material from Herotodus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Diodorus Siculus and Polyaenus, and Arrian.
According to Diodorus Siculus, after Alexander the Great died in 323 BC, Ptolemy Soter was given Egypt under the terms of the Partition of Babylon.
Curran synthesizes the state of knowledge (or misinformation) that these sources provide about Egyptian antiquity through the analysis of works of Herodotus, Plato, Diodorus Siculus, Euhemerus of Messina, Strabo, Pliny the Elder, Plutarch, and Apuleius, as well as the Neoplatonists Plotinus, Porphyry, and Iamblichus.
Diodorus Siculus confessed His gradual ease among the likes of this: Murdered, forgotten, nameless, terrible Beheaded girl, outstaring axe And beatification, outstaring What had begun to feel like reverence.
On the Cimmerians of Herodotus being called Cimbrians, see Diodorus Siculus 5.
His many classical sources include Hesiod, Alcman, Pindar, Herodotus, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Menander, Aristotle, Theophrastus, Aratus, Apollonius of Rhodes, Theocritus, Diodorus Siculus, Tibullus, Strabo, Hyginus, Horace, Diogenes Laertius, Lucian, and Claudian, to name but a few, along with many scholiasts and patristic authors such as the expected Lactantius, Eusebius, Augustine, and Fulgentius.
Skelton's translation of Diodorus Siculus consistently stresses that a writer's choice of words affects the way in which he portrays his subject, while Udall's preface to his a translation of Vermigli's A Discourse or Traictise .