Diodorus Siculus


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Diodorus Siculus

(dīədôr`əs sĭk`yo͞oləs), d. after 21 B.C., Sicilian historian. He wrote, in Greek, a world history in 40 books, ending with Caesar's Gallic Wars. Fully preserved are Books I–V and XI–XX, which cover Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Indian, Scythian, Arabian, and North African history and parts of Greek and Roman history. The history, which is a compilation of other sources, is often repetitive and contradictory. Historians generally regard it as uncritical and unreliable. It is valuable, however, as a source for the lost works of earlier authors, from whom he borrowed freely, and for his chronological lists of prominent figures from the 5th cent. to 302 B.C.

Diodorus Siculus

 

Born circa 90 B.C. in Agyrium, Sicily; died 21 B.C. Ancient Greek historian.

Diodorus was the author of the 40-volume work The Historical Library, of which only volumes 1-5 and 11-20 and fragments of the remaining volumes have survived. This work presents a synchronous account of the history of the ancient East, Greece, the Hellenistic states, and Rome from legendary times to the middle of the first century B.C. Even though Diodorus’ works are mere compilations, and chronologically inaccurate, they have a certain value owing to their use of several sources lost in ancient times. Of particular interest is the information on the classical period of Greek history, the description of the reigns of the emperors Philip II and Alexander the Great, and the reports of the slave uprisings in Sicily in the second century B.C.

WORKS

Diodori Bibliotheca historica, vols. 1-5. Edited by J. Teubner. Leipzig, 1888-1906.
In Russian translation:
In Istoricheskaia biblioteka, vols. 1-6. St. Petersburg, 1774-75.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diodorus Siculus, Diodorus of Sicily in Twelve Volumes, trans.
John Monfasani's contribution on Diodorus Siculus (61-152) is the most substantial.
43) A century ago, a scholar attempted to restore the Life of Epaminondas by bringing together quotations (with analyses) using not only an array of passages from Plutarch (some not having directly to do with Epaminondas), but also passages from Cornelius Nepos, Xenophon, Diodorus Siculus, Cicero, Polyaenus, and others to fit the passages together.
This story (no matter how overly embellished or even patently false it might originally have been) was certainly still circulating in Cleopatra's own lifetime, as indicated by its inclusion in the writings of Diodorus Siculus.
Then take up ancient history in the detail, reading the following books, in the following order: Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophontis Hellenica, Xenophontis Anabasis, Arrian, Quintus Curtius, Diodorus Siculus, Justin.
We know that bees were linked with Zeus, king of the gods, and according to Diodorus Siculus, it was he who gave these creatures their special colour and great resistance to winds and cold, as a reminder of the close bond between them.
Curran synthesizes the state of knowledge (or misinformation) that these sources provide about Egyptian antiquity through the analysis of works of Herodotus, Plato, Diodorus Siculus, Euhemerus of Messina, Strabo, Pliny the Elder, Plutarch, and Apuleius, as well as the Neoplatonists Plotinus, Porphyry, and Iamblichus.
His many classical sources include Hesiod, Alcman, Pindar, Herodotus, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Menander, Aristotle, Theophrastus, Aratus, Apollonius of Rhodes, Theocritus, Diodorus Siculus, Tibullus, Strabo, Hyginus, Horace, Diogenes Laertius, Lucian, and Claudian, to name but a few, along with many scholiasts and patristic authors such as the expected Lactantius, Eusebius, Augustine, and Fulgentius.
But her argument really begins with the seemingly unpromising Bibliotheca Historica of Diodorus Siculus, an early prose work in which Skelton translates Poggio Bracciolini's Latin translation of the Greek historian yet also subtly shifts the focus of authority away from events to those who record them, in effect underscoring the role of memoria in order to emphasize the creative, culture-making work of the historian.
Apart from Diodorus Siculus and the political sonnets of Milton and Wordsworth, they include several classics of travel literature in English and French, most notably the work of Volney.