Diodorus Siculus

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Diodorus Siculus

(dīədôr`əs sĭk`yo͞oləs), d. after 21 B.C., Sicilian historian. He wrote, in Greek, a world history in 40 books, ending with Caesar's Gallic Wars. Fully preserved are Books I–V and XI–XX, which cover Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Indian, Scythian, Arabian, and North African history and parts of Greek and Roman history. The history, which is a compilation of other sources, is often repetitive and contradictory. Historians generally regard it as uncritical and unreliable. It is valuable, however, as a source for the lost works of earlier authors, from whom he borrowed freely, and for his chronological lists of prominent figures from the 5th cent. to 302 B.C.

Diodorus Siculus

 

Born circa 90 B.C. in Agyrium, Sicily; died 21 B.C. Ancient Greek historian.

Diodorus was the author of the 40-volume work The Historical Library, of which only volumes 1-5 and 11-20 and fragments of the remaining volumes have survived. This work presents a synchronous account of the history of the ancient East, Greece, the Hellenistic states, and Rome from legendary times to the middle of the first century B.C. Even though Diodorus’ works are mere compilations, and chronologically inaccurate, they have a certain value owing to their use of several sources lost in ancient times. Of particular interest is the information on the classical period of Greek history, the description of the reigns of the emperors Philip II and Alexander the Great, and the reports of the slave uprisings in Sicily in the second century B.C.

WORKS

Diodori Bibliotheca historica, vols. 1-5. Edited by J. Teubner. Leipzig, 1888-1906.
In Russian translation:
In Istoricheskaia biblioteka, vols. 1-6. St. Petersburg, 1774-75.
References in periodicals archive ?
8, Jones 1931) whereas Diodorus of Sicily thought her abduction was near Enna, in Sicily (Library of History 5.
Especially valuable in identifying the sites were the travelogues of Pausanias written in AD 194 (Jones & Ormerod 1926; Jones 1931 ; 1935; 1939), Strabo writing in AD 23 (Jones 1927; 1950) and Diodorus of Sicily writing in about 39 BC (Oldfather 1939).
The most celebrated ancient sanctuary for Demeter was at Eleusis, now on the outskirts of the metropolitan area of Athens, where the goddess introduced the cultivation of grain to Attica, according to Diodorus of Sicily (Library of History 5.
Accounts of a remarkable duel between the Athenian athlete Dioxippus (1) and the Macedonian warrior Coragus 2 are related by both Diodorus of Sicily (17.
In the process, VanderKam exhibits mastery of the writings of Josephus, of the Aramaic papyri from Elephantine, of coins and bullae of the Persian period, of the writings of Diodorus of Sicily, and of intertestamental literature.
This final option is the one preferred by Heintz, who illustrates it in two extensive case studies--one on the figure of Eunus of Apamea, presented in Diodorus of Sicily (34.
This is partly because his achievement was eclipsed by the accomplishment of his son, but is no less attributable, as Bradford maintains, to the fact that "no ancient biography of Philip has survived, nor has any substantial history of the period" (xiv), though this evaluation is rather unfair to Diodorus of Sicily, who provides a fairly coherent narrative in his sixteenth book.