Diogenes Laërtius

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Laërtius, Diogenes:

see Diogenes LaërtiusDiogenes Laërtius
, fl. early 3d cent., Greek biographer. Extant is a work in 10 books on the lives and opinions of the philosophers from Thales to Epicurus, with whole books devoted to Plato and Epicurus. His work is an invaluable source of history.
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Diogenes Laërtius

(dīŏj`ənēz lāör`shēəs), fl. early 3d cent., Greek biographer. Extant is a work in 10 books on the lives and opinions of the philosophers from Thales to Epicurus, with whole books devoted to Plato and Epicurus. His work is an invaluable source of history.

Bibliography

See his Lives of Eminent Philosophers, tr. by R. D. Hicks (1925, repr. 1979–80).

References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Josephus and Philo were Hellenistic Jewish authors, and Diogenes Laertius, Seneca, and Cicero were Stoics.
The account of the conception of Plato by his virgin mother Perictione through Apollo, as related by Diogenes Laertius in Lives and Opinions of the Eminent Philosophers 3.
However, we can also understand the notion of 'in accordance with Nature' as 'representing our natural needs and desires' (Cicero, On Ends 3, 4; Diogenes Laertius 7, Epictetus, Discourses 1.
Paolo Crivelli defends the centrality of definition theory for the early Stoics, and provides translations from the likes of Diogenes Laertius and other commentators to show the distinct orientation of the Stoic theorists to definition theory (in terms of sayables and stateables).
Alison Brown is nonetheless the first to tell in full the story of the Epicurean revival that took place in Florence during the century following the dispatch from Constantinople to Florence of a manuscript of Diogenes Laertius in 1416, then Poggio Bracciolini's discovery of a manuscript of Lucretius' philosophical poem the following year, the translation of the former work into Latin by Ambrogio Traversi in 1433, and the circulation of both works in and after the 1440s.
In his Life of Aristotle, Diogenes Laertius tells us how Aristotle had learned that his nephew Callisthenes had been speaking too freely to Alexander, and how he had quoted to him two lines from Homer's Iliad, in which Thetis, mother of Achilles, had warned him of the dangers attaching to hasty speech:
Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers: Parmenides (9.
His many classical sources include Hesiod, Alcman, Pindar, Herodotus, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Menander, Aristotle, Theophrastus, Aratus, Apollonius of Rhodes, Theocritus, Diodorus Siculus, Tibullus, Strabo, Hyginus, Horace, Diogenes Laertius, Lucian, and Claudian, to name but a few, along with many scholiasts and patristic authors such as the expected Lactantius, Eusebius, Augustine, and Fulgentius.
If Musonius in Diatribe 4 states that all virtues are equally good for both men and women and belong to both genders in the same way, this was already maintained by Antisthenes, as is attested by Diogenes Laertius 6.
The line occurs as a separate saying twice elsewhere in Plutarch, but also independently in Diogenes Laertius and in the Gnomologium Vaticanum.
The Epistle to Menoeceus," cited in Diogenes Laertius, Book X (Cambridge: Harvard, 1965), 131, 125.
So Diogenes Laertius tells us in his variably useful biographical history of the philosophers.