Dionysian

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Dionysian

(in the philosophy of Nietzsche) of or relating to the set of creative qualities that encompasses spontaneity, irrationality, the rejection of discipline, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Believe with me in this Dionysiac life and in the rebirth of tragedy
And ultimately, the text itself has come to reflect the Swamp Thing's embrace of the Dionysiac.
perhaps dull view that the passions and dreams of men be disciplined and guided by reason, that our lives be Apollonian and Dionysiac at once, in that balance of force and form which, after all, had been recommended from the beginning of moral philosophy.
Dionysiac art wants to convince us of the eternal lust and delight of existence .
Cadmus and Tiresias come out dressed for Dionysiac worship, which they take very seriously--[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (we alone are in our right minds, the others are fools [196])--but which causes Pentheus to laugh and feel shame on his grandfather's behalf.
Euripides' Hekabe and the Somatics of Dionysiac Drama.
51) In the final section, celebrating the Dionysiac truths of the flesh and the mythic imagination over the Apollonian rationalisations of the intellectuals, he describes a vision he had after 'hogmagandie' (a magnificent Scots word for sexual intercourse) with his "Pyrrha' at Tunnel Beach; (52)
Although he resists a strict Kantian formalism, Grady is eager to distinguish his project from a more straightforward hermeneutics that rests upon a Nietzschian Apollonian / Dionysiac dialectic with its swings from emphasizing "order" to the more recent celebration of "disunity" "that has opened the text up to reveal its fissures, its faultlines, its 'other'" (3).
One may say that Dionysiac madness/insight is also the basis of mimetic art, enabling his adherents to see that which is not there and to be affected by or to refuse to suspend disbelief at the peril of losing themselves entirely to reality.
4), who is depicted as a religious ecstatic of the Dionysiac type (2.
After the middle of the third century, the happy, joyful scenes with the dancing, singing and quaffing Dionysiac thiasoi, the beautiful Nereids and their doting sea-centaurs, and the images of the deceased in the form of star-crossed lovers from Greek mythology, almost completely vanish from Roman sarcophagi.