Dionysian


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Related to Dionysian: Apollonian and Dionysian

Dionysian

(in the philosophy of Nietzsche) of or relating to the set of creative qualities that encompasses spontaneity, irrationality, the rejection of discipline, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
But in his epic verse drama and later symbolist plays, there seems to be an obvious tension between what one might call Apollonian and Dionysian elements that deserves exploration even if a certain critical tact may be needed.
However, these highly sensitive topics are explored subtly; the desires are neither explicitly described nor acted on, instead they function as a narrative subtext, disclosed through imagery and Dionysian symbolism, through the representation of the boys and their effect on the protagonists, and by the seemingly innocuous act of voyeurism.
The most illuminating writer on the meaning of tragedy, the nature of the Dionysian depths, and the problem of anti-Dionysian tendencies in modern-day society may be Friedrich Nietzsche.
The Dionysian drive, according to Nietzsche, is the primary component of Greek Tragedy that embodies the emotions, impulses, intuitions, feelings, experiences and character traits underlying the tragic character of human nature.
At first the music makes this island seem a little strange but, as the melodies go on, we realise that the island is connected to the male sacrifices of the ancient Dionysian rites.
Working as something like a vaccine, this Apolline housing presents the destructiveness of the Dionysian in a weakened form, so that increased resistance to it is possible while also recognizing its character and force.
It was of course precisely during the interwar period that the polarity of the Dionysian and the Apollonian proved particularly active in art produced in Germany, as Nietzsche's thought--or rather a corruption of it, a Nietzschean vulgate--came to dominate every discourse.
The story of Marsyas, as told in Callicles' fourth song, concerns the same struggle between Dionysian and Apollonian forces that Nietzsche would later explore in The Birth of Tragedy.
In contrast with the Apollonian realm of image and semblance, the Dionysian aesthetic is associated with the "imageless art of music" grounded in the Dionysian dithyramb, a hymn to the god Dionysus (Tragedy 14, 51).
As prelude to examination of Wolfe's, Gorsline's, and Harris's interaction with Apollonian and Dionysian aesthetics, it is fruitful to consider how these tendencies operated in Modernism more broadly.
Dionysian festivals are examined in the sixth chapter.