Dionysius Exiguus


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Dionysius Exiguus

(dīənĭsh`ēəs ĕksĭg`yo͞oəs), d. c.545, Roman monk, chronologist, and scholar, a transmitter of Greek thought to the Middle Ages. He made collections of 5th-century papal decretals and the canons of the early church councils. Dionysius, in an attempt to improve the reckoning of the date of Easter, was the first (525) to use our present system of reckoning a date from the time of the birth of Jesus (see eraera,
period of historic time. In geology, it is the name applied to large divisions of geological process, e.g., Paleozoic era (see geology). In chronology an era is a period reckoned from a fixed point in time, as before or after the birth of Christ—before Christ, B.C.
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Later studies discovered that Dionysius Exiguus had erred in his basic calculation.
So Dionysius Exiguus had to work backwards on whatever evidence he could find.
Our present system of dating the years BC and AD is based on the work of Dionysius Exiguus, a 6th century Roman monk, otherwise known as Denis the Short.
Among the topics are the argumenta of Dionysius Exiguus and their early recensions, the recension of the two Sirmond texts Disputation Morini and De deuisionibus temporum, marital discord in Northumbria leading to his and her Lent and Easter, Bede's primary source for the Vulgate chronology in his chronicles in De temporibus and De temporum ratione, problems in the transmission of De temporibus, computus in Hiberno-Latin literature, and the continuity of the Irish computistical tradition.
In the second chapter, "The Emergence of Canonical Legislation," Hess surveys the legislation promulgated by the various councils that met until Chalcedon, providing a useful, though increasingly brief, treatment of their canons (Nicaea is allotted two pages; Ephesus and Chalcedon, together, one paragraph), and a description of the various canonical collections, to the time of John Scholasticus and the subsequent Nomocanon in Fourteen titles, in the East, and Dionysius Exiguus in the West.
The "mistake" was made by a sixth century monk known as Dionysius Exiguus or in English Dennis the Small, the 85-year-old pontiff claims in the book 'Jesus of Nazareth: The Infancy Narratives', published on Wednesday, the Telegraph reported.