dioxin

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dioxin

[dī′äk·sən]
(organic chemistry)
A member of a family of highly toxic chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons; found in a number of chemical products as lipophilic contaminants. Also known as polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxin.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, it is understood that the dioxin was formed in the Netherlands.
Dioxins are a group of chemicals formed during combustion processes, such as waste incineration and are known to increase the likelihood of cancer with long term exposure.
The directives for detection of dioxins require limits of quantification to be 80 percent lower than the lowest reported level in the EPA standards.
We are concerned the tests for dioxins are only conducted over a six-hour time period, twice a year.
This result suggests that these supplements may help to reduce the maternal transfer of dioxins, and the reasons may be attributed to the following:
This is the first licensing of XDS dioxin detection technology to Poland and the third license in the European Union for the North Carolina company.
Field lab workers used to burn old fuel and debris at the site, which is the likely source of dioxins, a family of toxic chemicals believed to cause cancer.
Since a typical woman uses more than 11,500 tampons in her lifetime, even small traces of dioxin may add up.
Dr Tanja Pless-Mulloli from Newcastle University tested 98 eggs produced by hens which spent the majority of their time roaming in allotments across the city and found the majority - 74pc - contained higher levels of dioxins than is permitted under EC regulations for commercially-traded eggs.
In October of 2001, the European Council adopted a new set of regulations limiting dioxins in food, due to the fact that 95% of dioxin intake comes from food.
For the general population, there is only "dioxin," and dioxin is "bad" if it is present in any amount, even parts per trillion.
In June 1999, the dioxin crisis, caused by dioxin-contaminated feed components, exploded in Belgium, resulting in withdrawal of chicken and eggs from the market.