Diphda

Diphda

(dif -dă) See Cetus.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Fomalhaut and Beta ((3) Ceti (also known as Diphda or Deneb Kaitos) are the only stars of 2nd-magnitude or brighter in this region on our map--if we consider the non-aquatic Epsilon (e) Pegasi (Enif) and stars of the Great Square of Pegasus as merely bordering the region.
Moderately bright Diphda, or Beta ([beta]) Ceti, in the bottom of Cetus, the Whale, is just above this dim area and well to Fomalhaut's upper left.
0 Diphda, Beta Ceti, the brightest star in the constellation Cetus, the whale.
USS Diphda AKA59: Judy Coogan (734) 676-0148; judycoo@hotmail.
Moderately bright Diphda or Beta ([beta]) Ceti, in the bottom of Cetus, the Whale, is just above this area and well to Fomalhaut's upper left.
0-magnitude Beta ([beta]) Ceti, also called Deneb Kaitos or Diphda, is still low in the southeast.
org USS Diphda AKA59: Jack M Smith (281) 427-2575; 832-556-2525 (FAX); patnjack@ev1.
The fat tail of Cetus is marked by 2nd-magnitude Beta ([beta]) Ceti, also called Diphda or Deneb Kaitos.
Following the Square's east side south takes us toward Beta ([beta]) Ceti, or Diphda, the 2nd-magnitude star at the tail of Cetus.
This star is Beta ([beta]) Ceti, also called Diphda or Deneb Kaitos, supposedly marking the tail of Cetus, the Whale.
Cetus is marked on its tail and head by the 2nd-magnitude stars Beta ([beta]) Ceti, also called Diphda or Deneb Kaitos, and Alpha ([alpha]) Ceti, or Menkar, respectively.
A line extended down from the Square's eastern side leads near to another low and lonely fall star, Beta ([beta]) Ceti, named Deneb Kaitos or Diphda.