Diphilus


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Diphilus

(dĭf`ĭləs), fl. 300 B.C., Greek dramatist of the New Comedy, b. Sinope. His many dramas (perhaps 100) were extensively adapted by Plautus and Terence and influenced the entire Roman stage. The fragments of his works that remain reveal his talent for strongly contrasted scenes and brilliant theatrical effects.
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Philippe Legrand (1902, 371) proposed that the oddity was due to contamination, because Plautus assigned lines to Myrrhina that Diphilus had assigned to a male character in his Kleroumenoi, the professed Greek source of Plautus's play (Cas.
Diphilus would just as soon maintain his own corporeal truth, masochistic suggestions notwithstanding: "You should not; I would first/Mangle myself and find it" (3.
hetaira in Athens, invited Diphilus, the New Comedy writer, to a feast at her home in celebration of an Aphrodite festival (Machon ap.
41) It is obvious, on the other hand, that (i) is the scene which Terence introduced from Diphilus, depicting an adulescens .
On Casina as an adaptation from a Greek original by Diphilus see Prolog.
Diphilus excelled in scenes of action and spectacle, and his style is especially marked by its vivid imagery.
610d), Diphilus goes to Gnathea's place to celebrate the Aphrodisia, bringing with him all the apparatus for the party, including perfume, garlands, snacks, a kid goat, ribbons, fish, a cook, and a piper for later ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).
No names of characters preserved in fragments of Diphilus seem to play similar games.
11) The synchronism with Archilochus may have been based on the comedy of Diphilus portraying Hipponax and Archilochus as rival lovers competing for the favor of Sappho (see Athenaeus 13.
In his seventh and last novel, Gryll Grange, for example, the epigraphs to individual chapters are drawn from, among other authors, Alcaeus, Diphilus, Nonnus, Philetaerus, Anacreon, Palladas, and Alexis.
The connection is strengthened by turning to other popular representatives of New Comedy, such as Diphilus and Philemon, who make use of sexual themes and language, including even obscene jokes.