Disciplinary Codes

Disciplinary Codes

 

in the USSR, normative acts regulating the working order in certain branches of the economy for those categories of workers whose working conditions are such that breaches of labor discipline could have serious consequences.

Disciplinary codes have been adopted for workers on the railroads (July 31, 1964), in the merchant marine (June 18, 1949, with amendments and additions of June 11, 1964), in river transport (Nov. 22, 1966), in the fishing fleet (June 30, 1966), on support vessels of the Soviet Navy (Mar. 17, 1966), and in civil aviation (May 4, 1975). Codes have also been adopted for those working underground under hazardous conditions (Nov. 30, 1976) and for aviation workers of the Ail-Union Voluntary Society for Cooperation With the Army, Air Force, and Navy (Jan. 10, 1977).

In most cases, the codes comprise general rules, incentives, and measures against breaches of discipline. In the branches of industry mentioned above, the disciplinary codes cover only those workers whose functions typify the particular branch. For example, the code for railroad workers covers only those who work on the tracks, in the control rooms, in the central administration of the Ministry of Railroads, and in plants for the repair of rolling stock. In many of the codes, the incentives and measures against breaches of discipline go beyond those used with workers not covered by the codes. For example, sailors in the merchant marine can be denied shore leave for up to five days, can be transferred to a vessel of a lower group, and can be assigned to shore duty for up to one year. The codes set forth in detail the rights of supervisors in disciplinary matters. Labor disputes arising from sanctions imposed on workers covered by disciplinary codes are settled by superior bodies.

References in periodicals archive ?
Some may see that reflecting a shortcoming in charter schools, but it is more likely a reflection of charters' almost universal insistence on adherence to stricter dress and disciplinary codes.
BY MARK MCINTOSH BLUNDERING Irish Football Association chiefs are under pressure to reform their disciplinary codes after Cliftonville and Linfield had unprecedented fines rescinded.
A Cliftonville statement said: "Before assessing potential breaches of the Disciplinary Code we would urge the IFA to put these in the correct context and consider the efforts of clubs.
Educationists who spoke at the seminar said the main reason for this problem is the lack of rigid application of disciplinary codes in the schools.
A Fifa spokesperson cited disciplinary codes that stipulate "match suspensions not served during the competition for which they were intended (elimination or last match in the competition) are carried over.
Our disciplinary codes are changing and they will always do, with the chart becoming more student-oriented as educational systems in the world progress.
The fact they are subject to their own internal disciplinary codes does not exempt them from prosecution if they have committed a criminal offence.
Her atrocious behaviour breached the criminal law in a number of ways besides driving a coach and horses through the disciplinary codes of practice.
Houllier knows his way to Lancaster Gate - the former technical director of the France Football Federation has advised England's governing body on coaching matters, and future policy - including disciplinary codes.
Grampian's deputy Chief Constable David Beattie said he believed officers may have breached disciplinary codes.
Just one problem: There were no drug busts, and other violations the teachers thought they had found also were nonexistent, a result of two schools using different sets of disciplinary codes.