Discreteness


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Discreteness

 

discontinuity; the opposite of continuity. For example, a discrete change in a quantity with respect to time is the change taking place over particular intervals (in jumps); the system of whole numbers (as opposed to the system of real numbers) is discrete. In physics and chemistry discreteness signifies the granular structure of matter, its atomic nature.

References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 4 shows how well the smoothed probability of S2 = 1 matches periods when the target federal funds rate did not change for the model with the discreteness adjustment and the parameter values from Table 3.
Although the tribal element is no longer accepted, the discreteness of these categories is upheld through their continued use.
Ackerman, supra note 8, at 729-30 (arguing that the Carolene standard of discreteness and insularity is insufficient to determine whether homosexuals deserve protected status, because it is their anonymity that produces additional organizational costs and so increases their relative political powerless); Yoshino, supra note 7, at 509-38 (arguing that standards of immutability and invisibility are similarly insufficient to explain why homosexuals deserve constitutional protection).
Consequently, the degree of interchange between stocks from inshore and offshore fishing grounds and their relative discreteness cannot be determined from these studies.
Therefore, I suggest that a fundamental discreteness at the Plank scale of about [10.
We do not report median values because they are not informative due to price discreteness.
Downstairs, Sylvia Wolf presents fifty of the artist's vintage prints and studies, including his amateurish snapshots from Conceptual beachheads like Twentysix Gasoline Stations, to establish the discreteness of Ruscha's photographic practice and to complicate his claim that he is "not really a photographer.
Skud (1977) concluded that southern and northern groups mixed extensively at all ages of their life history and that, although populations of adults may be largely discrete in the summer, any such discreteness was temporary because tagging evidence suggested more extensive winter migrations associated with spawning.
I have little doubt that that favourite Anglo-Saxon device, the paratactic method (including the "appositive style": see Robinson [1985]), though a different technique, is ultimately to be related to phasing: in both cases the poet feels almost constrained to unfold his topic into several items so as to enclose discreteness within continuity; both phasing and parataxis are synecdochical in this sense.
Discreteness can confound tests for symmetry, that is, tests for equal responsiveness to pressure to increase or decrease.
However, because of the discreteness of the algorithm and the resulting discontinuity of v(p) in p, such a method produced unsatisfactory results.