bail

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bail,

in law, procurement of release from prison of a person awaiting trial or an appeal, by the deposit of security to insure his submission at the required time to legal authority. The monetary value of the security—known also as the bail, or, more accurately, the bail bond—is set by the court having jurisdiction over the prisoner. The security may be cash, the papers giving title to property, or the bond of private persons of means or of a professional bondsman or bonding company. Failure of the person released on bail to surrender himself at the appointed time results in forfeiture of the security. Bail is usually granted in a civil arrestarrest,
in law, seizure and detention of a person, either to bring him before a court body or official, or to otherwise secure the administration of the law. A person may be arrested for an alleged violation of civil or criminal law.
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. Courts have greater discretion to grant or deny bail in the case of persons under criminal arrest, e.g., it is usually refused when the accused is charged with homicide. The Eighth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States provides that "excessive bail shall not be required," but it does not provide any absolute right to bail.

bail

[bāl]
(engineering)
A loop of heavy wire snap-fitted around two or more parts of a connector or other device to hold the parts together.

bail

1. The wall of an outer court of a feudal castle.
2. A hinged loop that is used for lifting.

bail

1 Law
1. a sum of money by which a person is bound to take responsibility for the appearance in court of another person or himself, forfeited if the person fails to appear
2. the person or persons so binding themselves; surety
3. the system permitting release of a person from custody where such security has been taken
4. jump bail or (formal) forfeit bail to fail to appear in court to answer to a charge
5. stand or go bail to act as surety (for someone)

bail

2
Cricket either of two small wooden bars placed across the tops of the stumps to form the wicket

bail

, bale
1. a semicircular support for a canopy
2. a movable bar on a typewriter that holds the paper against the platen
References in periodicals archive ?
00 or with imprisonment of not more than one year, or both, at the discretion of the court.
He can be notified of the proceedings by advertisement or some other means at the discretion of the court, but the court will do all it can to end your marriage, and it should not take more than a matter of months.
YJB chief executive John Drew said: "Whether or not a young person is sentenced to custody is at the discretion of the court and decisions can be influenced by many factors such as the severity of the offence.
Currently, whether Rule 11 sanctions are applied is left to the discretion of the court on a case-by-case basis -- and judges often apply sanctions.
Refusal of bail in other circumstances is a matter for the discretion of the court.
Bill and Julia Hawker and their two daughters, who departed Heathrow earlier, will be classed as "victim participants" and will be able, at the discretion of the court, to question the defendant and give their opinion on sentencing.
Violators will be penalized with a fine of P1,000,000 or imprisonment of five years at the discretion of the court.
Violators face a fine of P1 million and a jail, term of not more than six years, or both upon the discretion of the court.
The company emphasized, however, that the decision to grant its extension of exclusivity is solely within the discretion of the court.
However, any sentence following conviction would be dictated by the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, which take into account a number of factors, and would be imposed in the discretion of the Court.
The penalty for a minor who violates the act shall be determined at the discretion of the court and may include any of the following:
The Court's decision did not address the cost issue and the scheduling of any proceedings to resolve the issue is also within the discretion of the Court.