data error

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data error

[′dad·ə ‚er·ər]
(computer science)
A deviation from correctness in data, usually an error, which occurred prior to processing the data.

data error

A condition in which data on a digital medium has been altered erroneously. The error can manifest as several incorrect bits or even a single bit that is 0 when it should be 1 or vice versa. See parity checking.
References in periodicals archive ?
For new designs, it is anticipated that the rate of uncontained titanium disk failures due to melt-related defects will be decreased by a factor of at least three," he adds.
Thus, mitigating exposure time for possible secondary disk failure is of paramount importance.
The utility automates the task of detecting and evaluating vital warning signs of impending disk failure, providing an early warning to save server and desktop data before disaster strikes.
As a result video recording places higher demands on disk drives, generating heat, vibration and wear which shortens disk lifespan and increases the risk of disk failure in video management systems.
The computer notifies you of disk failure and continues to operate without interruption.
Whether an earthquake, a flood, a blackout or a hard disk failure should catch them by surprise, these backups would ensure the survival of their information.
Accordance ARAID reports the disk failure so users can replace the bad drive without having to shut the system down.
The ARAID 2200 maintains two copies of hard disk data at all times so data is never lost and computers do not crash in the event of a hard disk failure.
Mirroring protects data and keeps applications operational in the event of disk failure.
RAID-5 (striped parity): A single disk failure does not result in data loss; however, if a second disk fails before replacement of the first failed drive and prior to stripe reconstruction, all the data in the stripe is lost.
The device mirrors PC data to two SATA II drives ensuring critical data is not lost in the event of a disk failure.
The obvious choice is to create a mirror image of the disk -- a starting place that gives you an exact copy of your disk on a CD, DVD, network drive or tape so that in the event of a hard disk failure, you can recreate exactly where you were the moment you made the backup.