Dispersed Phase


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Related to Dispersed Phase: Continuous phase, sol, Tyndall effect

Dispersed Phase

 

the aggregate of small, uniform solid particles, droplets of liquids, or bubbles of gas that are uniformly distributed in the surrounding (dispersion) medium. The dispersed phase and the dispersion medium form disperse systems.

References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, coalescence in polymer blends may lead to larger particle sizes already at dispersed phase concentration of more than about 1 wt% (70), (71).
In terms of the similarity between the changes of the total attenuation and that of the particle size with the HDPE-g-MAH content, it is reasonable to speculate that the attenuation could indirectly reflect the change of the particle size of the dispersed phase.
Blending PLA with low-cost commodity PEs as dispersed phase could be an alternative to find the desired requirements for different applications, although immiscible blends with less biodeeradability character and poor barrier properties to oxygen (02) and carbon dioxide (C02) will result.
The fractured surfaces were then immersed in formic acid at room temperature for 12 h to remove the dispersed phase domains (PA6).
In fact, an important shear stress should ultimately yield a smaller dispersed phase.
obl]) heights on time of the spontaneous imbibition in the cases of emulsions with the various dispersed phase concentrations and with/without adding of gelatine.
The slip boundary condition for the dispersed phase is prescribed according to the model in [18] as the first step in the computations.
Basic relation exists between the hold up ([psi]) (the volume fraction of dispersed phase in the system), the interfacial area per unit volume (a), and the bubble or droplet diameter ([D.
The onset of emulsion shear thinning is often a function of the dispersed phase volume fraction, sometimes occurring only at higher volume fractions, and sometimes occurring at volume fractions as low as 10 percent (Otsubo and Prud'homme 1994).
This unit reduces the dispersed phase droplets to an extremely small size-usually 2 mirons or less, with many droplets in the sub micron range.
Colloids are classified by the state of their components and the degree of attraction between the dispersed phase and dispersion medium.
This is the case for toughened engineering polymers that contain relatively small concentration (10 per cent or less) of a dispersed phase, which exists in the form of small droplets.