diaper

(redirected from Disposable diaper)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

diaper

a. a woven pattern on fabric consisting of a small repeating design, esp diamonds
b. fabric having such a pattern
c. such a pattern, used as decoration

diaper

diaper
An allover pattern with motifs placed in a repeated design, esp. on a rectangular or diagonal grid.
References in periodicals archive ?
In recent years, the baby disposable diaper industry of China has developed rapidly, but the market penetration rate is still much lower than that in developed countries; in 2011, China's market penetration rate was just 40%.
Disposable diapers normally take centuries to biodegrade in landfills.
This case study focuses not on one firm but on three manufacturers supplying the disposable diaper market in Japan (Unicharm, Kao and P&G), and in particular on each firm's product development process and their competitive relationship.
According to a 2000 study by Greenpeace International, most brands of disposable diapers contain Tributyltin (TBT)--a toxic pollutant known to cause hormonal problems in humans and animals.
In fact, Kimberly-Clark and P&G market all but one of the 14 best-selling disposable diaper brands in chain drug stores.
The use of disposable diapers among boys born in 1961-1965 in Denmark was lower (4.
But now apparently with a pinch of baking soda, a drop of aloe vera and the Cookie Monster, the Houston company that makes disposable diapers in Vancouver has righted itself.
In 7 infants a mixed growth was obtained from the bag specimen, while specimens collected from the disposable diaper were sterile; on no occasion did the diaper sample show a mixed growth when the bag sample was sterile.
A report by the Environmental Action Foundation of Washington states, "Parents have been deluged by confusing studies and advertising from the disposable diaper industry.
One disposable diaper, they note, takes more than 100 years to biodegrade in a landfill.
While there are heated arguments as to whether cloth or disposable diapers are more environmentally friendly, there are natural options for both.
Weyerhaeuser had requested Judge Murphy to reconsider her earlier decision that found Weyerhaeuser liable for breach of warranties in connection with the 1993 transfer of its disposable diaper business to Paragon.