diaper

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Related to Disposable diapers: Cloth Diapers

diaper

a. a woven pattern on fabric consisting of a small repeating design, esp diamonds
b. fabric having such a pattern
c. such a pattern, used as decoration

diaper

diaper
An allover pattern with motifs placed in a repeated design, esp. on a rectangular or diagonal grid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Disposable diapers is the largest end-use application segment for super absorbent polymers, accounting for nearly one-thirds of overall demand.
Modern cloth diapers hold their resale value well, and a large number of people are looking for alternatives to disposable diapers.
com/research/62mtw4/china_disposable) has announced the addition of the "China Disposable Diaper Industry Report, 2012-2013" report to their offering.
The most important claim today in disposable diapers in North America is eco-friendly packaging, Mintel states in its October 2012 "Category Insight: Diapers" report, such packaging noted in a fifth of new launches for the year ending September 2012.
Nippon Shokubai had planned to boost its production to meet the growing demand for disposable diapers in China, the paper said.
Alethia Vazquez-Morillas of the Autonomous Metropolitan University in Mexico City has shown that a fungus called Oyster mushrooms, Pleurotus ostreatus, can devour 90 percent of a disposable diaper within two months.
The estimated twenty-seven billion disposable diapers used each year in the U.
However, findings like the British government report mentioned before and the innovations being made in disposable diapers have helped support the case for using throwaway diapers.
Products that are more absorbent and leakproof have moved the category forward over the past few years, while pressure from environmental groups has led some manufacturers of disposable diapers to seek ways to make their products more biodegradable or recyclable.
Disposable diapers are made of plastics like nylon, polyester, polyethylene, and/or polypropylene produced by forcing resins through tiny holes at high temperatures and then rolling the threads flat with irons to bond the fibers.