Disraeli


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Disraeli

Benjamin, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield. 1804--81, British Tory statesman and novelist; prime minister (1868; 1874--80). He gave coherence to the Tory principles of protectionism and imperialism, was responsible for the Reform Bill (1867) and, as prime minister, bought a controlling interest in the Suez Canal. His novels include Coningsby (1844) and Sybil (1845)
References in periodicals archive ?
But the difference between Disraeli and other social critics of his age is as dramatic as what they had in common.
Cesarani's biography follows a newer trend of historians viewing Disraeli through a more critical lens.
Macdonald se trouve a Londres a la fin de l'ete 1879 et le premier ministre Benjamin Disraeli (lord Beaconsfield) l'invite a lui rendre visite au manoir de Hughenden, son domaine rural situe a une cinquantaine de kilometres a l'ouest de Londres.
Macdonald was in London in the late summer of 1879 and was invited by Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli (Lord Beaconsfield) to visit him at Hughenden Manor, his country estate some 50 kilometres west of London.
With volume nine, Michel Pharand takes over as principal editor of the series and director of the Disraeli Project, succeeding the eminent Mel Wiebe, former project director and general editor of the preceding eight volumes.
The novel as a form was helpful to Disraeli because the bedrock of its readership was the recently-enfranchised middle classes and thus Disraeli was able to get his political vision across to the public, something he achieved, O'Kell argues, with the first novel in his Young England trilogy, Coningsby (1844), which promotes an alternative Conservatism to that practiced by Robert Peel's Conservative government of 1841-46.
Disraeli subtitled his book, "Two Nations", a hint of conflict, perhaps revolution, to come.
Mr Miliband said: "I didn't become leader of the Labour Party to reinvent the world of Disraeli or Attlee but I do believe in that spirit, that spirit of one nation.
But Harris himself devotes considerably more pages (68) to his chapters on Disraeli than to those on Salisbury (52), Winston Churchill (40), and Thatcher (21)--and rightly so.
The first is the book's only Jewish philosemite: Benjamin Disraeli.
British Prime Ministers and Democracy: From Disraeli to Blair.
WE published a photograph of the milk being delivered by horse and cart in Disraeli Street in the Cannon Street area of Middlesbrough in 1956 in the April edition of Remember When.