Dissipation of Energy


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Dissipation of Energy

 

the transformation in physical systems of part of the energy of an ordered process (for example, electrical energy) into energy of a disordered process—in the final analysis, thermal energy (such as joule heat). In mechanical systems, the transformation of part of the system’s mechanical energy into other forms, such as heat, occurs as a result of the presence of forces of resistance; dissipation of energy in the atmosphere is the transformation of part of the kinetic energy of the wind into heat under the influence of internal friction.

References in periodicals archive ?
Frictional dissipation of energy, increases as cutting speed increases from 800 to 1200 m/min.
General dissipation of energy, as well as other mechanical properties of materials, are determined by their structure.
By reducing wear and friction nanoscale protective coatings increase the lifetime of the working material at the same time that they reduce the dissipation of energy as heat, thus increasing the efficiency of the vehicle.
The loss modulus, E", is associated with the dissipation of energy as heat due to the deformation of the material and is defined as E" = ([sigma]o/[epsilon]o) sin[delta].
For resins that are not thermally sensitive, dissipation of energy in the interior of polymer may be advantageous, however, since melting rates may be increased slightly.
In other words, the linking of the two doughnuts prevents the dissipation of energy.
As a result, there is minimal dissipation of energy so that the compressor creates relatively little heat and there is little wear in the system.