disorder

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disorder

[dis′ȯrd·ər]
(crystallography)
Departures from regularity in the occupation of lattice sites in a crystal containing more than one element.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second section, "Developmental Perspectives," focuses on incest, child abuse, and on the occurrence of dissociative disorders in children.
A co-diagnosis of dissociative disorder related with trauma is observed in approximately half of the patients with psychogenic seizure.
Children with dissociative disorders may display a wide range of somatoform dissociative symptoms such as sensory losses, loss of motor control, generalized paralysis, seizure like symptoms and alterations of vision, hearing, speech, taste, and smell (2,3).
DSM-IV does not present an adequate picture of dissociative disorders, and the diagnostic criteria are substandard, compared with [criteria for] other disorders in DSM," said Dr.
31) includes eight items of DES, an indicator of a proneness to develop dissociative disorders has prevalent use.
R] Dissociative disorders and epilepsy share a number of common symptoms that include amnesia, fugue, depersonalisation, derealisation, and identity change.
Clinicians who treat dissociative disorders are also faced with challenges because these disorders are a symptomatic enigma (Dell, 2009; Gillig, 2009).
Yet a fairly pervasive silence on this intriguing topic currently exists within the dissociative disorders and human sexuality fields.
The scale has been used earlier in population samples, and has been shown to discriminate significantly between patients with dissociative disorders, other disorders and normal control subjects when a cutoff score of 30 was used (Carlson, Putnam, 1993; Maaranen, Tanskanen, Honkalampi, Haatainen, Hintikka, 2005; Putnam, Carlson, Ross, 1996).
Chapters also cover diagnostic issues and controversies; myths and misunderstandings; distribution of these disorders by age, gender, and specific groups; theories of causes; daily coping; and related somatoform and dissociative disorders.
Using the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS) and the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), Hughes compared trance channelers, DID-diagnosed individuals, and a healthy group.