cognitive dissonance

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cognitive dissonance

[¦käg·nəd·iv ′dīs·ən·əns]
(psychology)
Psychological conflict that results from incongruous beliefs and attitudes held simultaneously.

cognitive dissonance

the experience of competing, opposing or contradictory thoughts, attitudes or actions leading to a feeling of tension and the need to achieve consonance. The term was introduced by Festinger (1957). In his definition dissonant cognitions exist when Belief A implies the negation of Belief B. For example, ‘Smoking causes lung cancer’ is dissonant with ‘I smoke’. The dissonance can be reduced in a variety of ways, either by adjusting Belief A or Belief B. Belief A could be adjusted by disregarding medical reports that confirm the belief and by paying particular attention to sceptical reports. Belief B can be adjusted by smoking less, or smoking tobacco of a low carcinogenic type.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dissonance theory has subsequently been described as "the most important single development in the history of social psychology.
Cognitive dissonance theory suggests that this is more likely to occur when users are strongly committed to their opinions.
To reduce addicts' intrinsic motivation and then induce them to engage in attitude-discrepant behavior could be done by borrowing from cognitive dissonance theory.
Aronson, Elliot (1992), "The Return of the Repressed: Dissonance Theory Makes a Comeback," Psychological Inquiry, Vol.
In line with Festinger's dissonance theory, the model includes the conflicts between attitudes and decisions or behavior that are specific for counterfeits and that lead to cognitive dissonance.
The second section, Changing Attitudes and Behaviors, includes "Processing Persuasive Communications," "'Who Says It': Source Factors in Persuasion," "Message Factors," "Personality and Persuasion," "Cognitive Dissonance Theory," and "Interpersonal Persuasion.
According to Leon Festinger's A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, the classic cognitive dissonance theory explanation for this is that ".
The application of cognitive dissonance theory suggests that participants who receive a monetary incentive in combination with a survey may experience dissonance if they do not complete the survey or at least give it serious consideration (Furse & Stewart).