cognitive dissonance

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cognitive dissonance

[¦käg·nəd·iv ′dīs·ən·əns]
(psychology)
Psychological conflict that results from incongruous beliefs and attitudes held simultaneously.

cognitive dissonance

the experience of competing, opposing or contradictory thoughts, attitudes or actions leading to a feeling of tension and the need to achieve consonance. The term was introduced by Festinger (1957). In his definition dissonant cognitions exist when Belief A implies the negation of Belief B. For example, ‘Smoking causes lung cancer’ is dissonant with ‘I smoke’. The dissonance can be reduced in a variety of ways, either by adjusting Belief A or Belief B. Belief A could be adjusted by disregarding medical reports that confirm the belief and by paying particular attention to sceptical reports. Belief B can be adjusted by smoking less, or smoking tobacco of a low carcinogenic type.
References in periodicals archive ?
The advances in the history of cognitive dissonance theory.
Cognitive dissonance theory examines the factors which influence students' behaviours, attitudes, and how they rationalize the situations according to their own feelings and behaviour.
To the best of our knowledge, no research has used cognitive dissonance theory to understand how teachers' heterogeneous beliefs--beliefs of culturally proficient teaching and deficit beliefs about academic achievement of diverse students--are parsed in accordance with practices.
Cognitive dissonance theory does not suggest a correct decision; but more rather, the theory provides a description of how individuals rationalize decisions psychologically within themselves (Goodwin, 2010).
Once again, according to cognitive dissonance theory attitude change was observed in the paradigmatic situations of forced compliance.
Cognitive dissonance theory is basically based on the assumption that people try to be consistent.
The cognitive dissonance theory assumes that the dissonance occurs between the individual ideas and behaviors when he recognizes a new cognition that is not consonant with his exisiting beliefs and opinions.
Cognitive dissonance theory predicts that when individuals experience high levels of hypocritical dissonance between their behavior and their beliefs, they will feel strong psychological pressure to reduce that dissonance.
Following this, I utilize research on cognitive dissonance theory to explore potential connections between dissonance reduction and processes of resistance.
We were comforted by Festinger's (1957) Cognitive Dissonance Theory which has been modified to say that attitudes may change quickly when people are confronted by the reality that they are "wrong".
1969), "Can cognitive dissonance theory explain consumer behavior?
Cognitive dissonance theory holds that our reactions to these sorts of psychological stimuli tend to fall somewhere along a continuum on which each point represents a strategy for returning our consciousnesses into cognitive balance (Huegler, 2006; Van Overalle & Jordens, 2002).